World Open U1800 Game 8 and Thoughts

tired 3[Event “World Open U 1800”]
[Date “2019.07.07”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Andrew Zhang”]
[Black “Mike Callaham”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B07”]
[WhiteElo “1820”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]

Game 8. It only took a few moves to realize that I was getting tired. I hadn’t played in 10 months! 1 loss out of 7 games still had me feeling good though. I also knew that I was working with part 4 of the rule. I decided to just draw on much discipline as I could, and hoped that would have to carry me through. I knew I had probably fallen out of any serious chance at 1st place, but that wasn’t why I was there. I wanted Scholarship Chess Business Center methods to carry me as far as my energy would allow. I’d never played 9 rounds straight before! As you will see, energy and discipline are heavily intertwined. I lasted 7.5 rounds! 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bg5?!world open 8-1This system has nuisance value but is considered by all of theory to be one of the weakest answers to the Philidor!} c6 6. Qd2 Qc7 7. O-O-O Be7 8. h4 b5 9. Bd3 a5world open 8-2It’s amazing to me how these young players find such good moves at times. Black has equalized and is slowly creeping up on the initiative. White’s next move is the computer’s top choice.  That for me is very instructive!} 10. Ne2! h6 11. dxe5? I know that calculating ed and de every turn is annoying!  It’s one of the features I like about this opening.  According to Kosten and the article I published in 2010, black has the better center because he has pawn control of d5 while white does not have control of d4. There are other benefits but hey, I’m not going to tell you everything and leave myself nothing to play?! LOL (11. Be3 Ng4 Black has a small advantage here. White had to play Ng3, Kb1, h5, Kb1, Nh2, or c3.  de was 11th on the list. 12. Ng3 Ndf6 13. Qe2 a4 14. a3 Bd7 15. Rhe1 O-O Black is definitely in the drivers seat.) 11… dxe5 12. Bxf6 {Just retreat the thing for crying out loud. This is where studying would have paid off.  This move aids my development and gives me the bishop pair! Nxf6 13. Qc3 Bd6
14. Ng3 O-O 15. Qd2world open 8-3

It appears that the pressure on f2 can begin now! That means no forward movement for either knight. That’s so cool!} Bg4?  (15… Bc5! 16. Nf1 Rd8 17. Qe2 a4 18. Ne3 a3 19. b3 Ng4 20. c3 Qa7 21. Rhe1 Be6 22. Kb1 Rab8 Putting the squeeze is better than what I played. I wanted to pin the knight down and maybe play rad8 but, that strategy is for when they are on the kingside!) 16. Kb1 Rfd8 17. Qe3 Be6 18. h5 {?!} Ng4 19. Qe2 world open 8-4Qb6?! According to the computer 19 …Bc5 is stronger and it’s also begging for a5-a4. I’m exhausted and I’m just relying on our methods and procedures to get me through the game!} (19… Bc5 20. Rdf1 a4 21. Nf5 a3 22. b3 Qa5 23. Qd2 Qa7 24. Qc3 b4 25. Qe1 Nxf2 26. Rh4 Rd7 27. Nxe5 Bxf5 28. exf5 Re8 29. f6 gxf6 30. Qd2 Rxe5 31. Qxh6 Rxd3  Wins the game!!) 20. Rhf1 Bc5 21. Rd2 a4 22. Nf5world open 8-5

Nxf2?? It was here that I got scared. I realized I was going blind.  That’s when you start having hind sight instead of foresight! LOL   The smoke and mirrors of chess exhaustion had began to show it’s ugly and repugnant head!!} (22… a3! 23. b3 Qa5 24. c3 Qxc3 25. Rc2 Qb4 26. Qd2 Bxf5 27. exf5 Qxd2 28. Rxd2 Bxf2 29. Be4 Rxd2 30. Nxd2 Rd8 31. Nf3 c5 32. Bc6 c4 33. Rc1 cxb3 34. axb3  Black is winning hard!) 23. Rxf2?? Mistakes come in pairs!! (23. N3h4 Qa5 24. a3 Nxd3 25. Rxd3 Bf8 26. Rg3 Kh8 27. Qf3 Qd2 28. Ne3 Rd7 29. Qd1 Qa5 30. Qe1 b4 31. Ka1 Rb7 32. Rgf3 bxa3 33. Qxa5 axb2+ 34. Kb1 Rxa5 Enough said) 23… Bxf5! Smoke and mirrors!! I actually thought that taking the rook was a better move. I expected this combination… (23… Bxf2 24. Qxf2 Qxf2 25. Rxf2 (25. Ne7!?+  Forgetting about this until I had looked at it again for a long time. Kf8 26. Ng6+ fxg6 27. Rxf2 Kg8) 25… Bxf5 26. exf5 e4 27. Be2 exf3 28. Bxf3 Rd6) 24. Rf1 Bg4 25. Qe1 a3 26. b3world open 8-6Be3?  What am I doing?? (26… Bb4 27. Qf2 Qa5 28. Rdd1 Bxh5 29. Qh4 Bd2 30. c3 Qxc3 31. Rxd2 Bxf3 32. Rc2 Qxd3 33. Rxf3 Qd1+ 34. Rc1 Qd4) 27. Re2 Bxf3 28. Rxe3 Bxh5 29. c4 bxc4 30. Bxc4 Rd1+ 31. Qxd1 Bxd1 32. Rxf7world open 8-7.jpg

I sat there for 20 minutes trying to figure out Q takes at e3 and thought I couldn’t move the g pawn.  I don’t need to move the g pawn with mate threats. lol  I was obviously confused so what did my opponent do?  what every smart one should, offer a draw.  I broke that rule too.  Whenever a kid offers you a draw it’s because they are losing.  double check very closely.  I was getting to tired and lost confidence and accepted the draw.  to be honest, if I hadn’t, I’d have probably taken the rook.  That’s winning too.  Until we got to the analysis board I didn’t know it was a win!} Kh8 33. Rg3 Qd4 34. Kc1 Bh5 Threatening mate!tired 2My last round won’t make it to the analysis. I could have simply withdrawn. I was absolutely useless. You could have set up 50 winning positions and if they were beyond a wbwbw//bwbwb I would have blown them all.  My 1st World Open was a smashing success for me and the principle I teach.  I’m very happy.  1/2-1/2

 

K-8 Kids being coached by 16 yr old and 6 yr old Coaches, takes 2nd in the k-12

may vsca 3.jpg

This has been a fun session at Next Up, Lucille Brown.  Jason Moorefield 16,  Anagha Sinkar 6, and their parents really deserve all the credit for this.  Jason is a SCBC Master Coach.  You become a Master Coach by coaching 100 sessions.  Jason was actually number 114 in the World, Under 16, until his recent birthday.  Anagha is 18th for girls under 7 in the US.  They alternate Tues and Thursdays as the coaching team of Lucille Brown Middle School.  This past weekend at the Meadowdale Spring Tournament, Nazerria Thomas and Laiyla Joseph teamed up to bring home 2nd place in the combined middle and high school section of this national tournament!!   Laiyla (R) making her sixth tournament appearance in 6 months knocked of a career high 639 player to get herself an individual medal performance.  Nazerria (l) was appearing in her 1st US chess tournament. By the way Coach Anagha played in the k-5 section and finished 1st with a perfect score of 4-0!  It was all girl power this weekend!  Hats off to the ladies!!!

Nazerria Thomas and Cole Felix are looking forward to Scholarship Chess Business Center’s summer work program.  From late June until mid August, selected Rated Tournament Chess Players will be trained in Business to Business  Marketing, Fund Raising, and Chess Coaching.  Our goal is to show them that they can earn money now and get ready for college.  Successful kids coaching successful kids.   Let’s see what’s next!?

Rated Tournament Chess Players nationwide, of any age, looking for work may contact Mike Callaham @ 804-426-6058

Chess… Tool or Toy!?

If you want a chess scholarship from US Chess, here is the criteria.  Get on board as soon as possible.  Once you read this you should have a better understanding of why chess is such a good application builder and why chess deserves to be listed under the, “Accomplishments” instead of, “Hobbies and Interests”!  Chess can be a tool or a toy.  The choice is yours!!!

By US Chess|January 5, 2018|Administration, College, Kids, News
Are you a chess player and a scholar? If you’re a US Chess member, and a high school junior or senior, please apply for the 2018 Scholar-Chessplayer Award. Download the 2018 Scholar-Chessplayer Application (Word file).
If you are a current US Chess member you are eligible to apply for a 2018 National Scholar-Chessplayer award if you:

Played in at least 25 Regular-rated US Chess or FIDE games during calendar year 2017. Games that are not regular rated do not count towards the 25 game requirement.  

Have shown outstanding achievement both in academics and chess

Completed at least one year of chess-related community service since the beginning of 9th Grade

Articulate in an essay (of 500 words or less) how your selection as a 2018 Scholar-Chessplayer will enable you to further your education, and continue your chess activities in the future

A total of five awards of $1,500.00 each will be presented for a total of $7,500.00 in scholarship money. Previous recipients of this award are not eligible. These scholarships are awarded annually by US Chess, and funded by the US Chess Trust and The National Scholastic Chess Foundation. They recognize outstanding high school students who promote a positive image of chess.

Applications are available here.

Applications are scored equally in four areas: Academics, Chess Playing, Community Contributions, and the Personal Essay. Contact Susan Kantor, Scholastics Associate, at the US Chess Office, (931) 787-1234 x136 or email skantor@uschess.org with any questions.

Your completed application consists of the documents listed below. Incomplete applications will not be evaluated by the selection committee.

The cover page of the Application, which contains basic information about yourself.

Your high school transcripts showing all courses and grades.
Your SAT or ACT scores (pre-SAT scores are not acceptable).
Evidence that you have played at least 25 US Chess or FIDE rated games during calendar year 2017.
A list and brief description of your best Chess Accomplishments.
Examples of your Chess-related Community Service since the beginning of 9th Grade or later.
A letter of recommendation from a teacher in a current or former school you have attended in 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th
A letter of recommendation from a Chess Coach or Tournament Director.
A letter of support from someone other than a parent, guardian or relative, attesting to the nature, duration and impact of your chess-related community service. We also encourage you to submit newspaper articles or web-based stories as evidence.
Your essay of no more than 500 words describing how your being recognized as a Scholar-Chessplayer would help you continue contributing to the greater US Chess community in the future.
OPTIONAL: A recent color photograph of yourself, either a headshot or full-length.
You can send your application to us in two ways—email or regular mail. If you use email, we must receive your application by Friday, March 2nd, 2018. If you send your application by one of many available postal carriers, it must be postmarked by midnight on Monday, February 26, 2018.

Recipients who attend the 2018 National High School Chess Championship in Columbus, OH on April 27th – 29th, 2018, will be recognized at the event. Attending the 2018 Nationals tournament is not a requirement to be eligible for the 2018 Scholar-ChessPlayer Award.

Send your completed application to:

US Chess Federation

Attn: Susan Kantor

P.O. Box 3967 Crossville, TN 38557-3967

OR Email – Attn: Susan Kantor at skantor@uschess.org

No matter what you want to do in the field of chess, to be a complete chess personality means, you can’t play all the time!!  Strong coach, referee, and organizer activities and certifications will sometimes mitigate your rating, but never the other way around!!  Just being an applicant for this scholarship is an accomplishment worthy of discernment on a college or employment application!!  Master the rules, record your games, and continually prepare for increased leadership!  Stop playing around!! lol

k-3 student picks up 1132 points in just 65 games!

From 107-1010 in just 65 games.

Playing an average of just 5 tournament games a month, Saket Sambaraju has raised his rating from 107 – 1010!!  With help RCI coaching, the best chess mom a coach could ask for, and being tough when it counted Saket has learned how to improve and win at chess!  Saket became an RCI student last year just before the Commonwealth Games on July 23rd.   At the time, his tournament record was 1 – 9.  When I went over for the orientation, I just remember how happy and playful he was with the chess pieces at the board.  He was doing fake combinations, setting up pawn walls, and just generally goof balling.  Believe it or not, this is a good sign!  Stacking pieces to see how high you can get them… that’s another story!  When he and I played, he changed immediately into a serious thinker.  He had intensity.  I knew then and there he was going to be a great student. Just 5 weeks later he played in the VA Closed.  He played 5 games, and received best performance under 600 with a score of 3 – 2.  His rating jumped from 107 to 307.  He just kept smiling from ear to ear.  In total, Saket played 17 games in September and brought his rating up to 580.  Yes, that was 107 – 580 in just 17 games. His RCI record, 12 – 5.  Saket was proof that if you want your kids to really feel good about themselves when it comes to chess, it’s never to soon to start taking them to tournaments!  In October he took 1st place in the k-5 at Meadowdale with a perfect 4 – 0, then went 2 – 2 at a k-8 2 weeks later.  His rating jumps to 891.  That’s 784 points in just 25 games.  His RCI record is 18 – 7!!  Remember… 600 points in 24 games or you get a refund!!

Let’s take a moment to get in the chess students and parents heads for just a moment.  It’s really important in chess to stay grounded after success.  Once the winning begins, parents and players quite often feel ready to take on the world.  Remember this, when you raise the age group, you are having your child play against more mature children that have had to get their rating against other more mature players.  A k-5 player that is at 500 is not playing a player of equal strength even if the k-8 or a k-12 player has a rating of 500.  That k-8 you can add 100 – 150 points and the k-12 you can add 150 – 250.  If you want your child to play up, entering them in the class section of a non scholastic chess tournaments is in my opinion a better way to go!  Holding their own with and beating adults is what will really begin to make your child look at themselves differently!

For those reasons, Saket took a ding in December and January and his rating fell down to 762!  What Saket does next is what separates the tournament player from the enthusiast and it’s why you must be rated to impress anyone outside of America when you claim to be a chess player.  Saket’s enthusiasm was at an all time low.  He said it was getting tiresome and boring.  Translation: ” I can beat all of my friends and family members… these strangers are too tough.”  What did we do to correct it?  I sat Saket and his parents down and showed them the tournament records of all of his opponents.  I showed Saket his 1st 50 games and we compared his performance to theirs.  Over 90% of his opponents had played worse and had lower ratings than him at the 50 game mark.  Many of his opponents had played 2, 3, and even 4 times as many games as he had played and were not even over 1000 yet.  Saket and his parents were shocked.  Saket said, ” Why do they play so many games without their rating going up?”  I said, ” It’s because they always want to play and never want to study.  The other mistake they make is they don’t review their games to stop repeating the same or similar mistakes!”  He said, “Teach me openings!?” I didn’t think he was 100% ready to study openings but we went to work on them and he did extremely well. Since then he is 21.5 out of 31!  A 66% win ratio will keep your rating going up at any level! Last year he was k-3.  Watch out this kid is dangerous!!!!!

Want to become a dangerous chess player??  Join us every Thursday from 6-10 or get some private lessons from the best coach in VA.  804-426-6058. Mike Callaham.