World Open U1800 Game 6

[Event “Worl Open U1800”]
[Date “2019.07.06”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Eric Tipton”]
[Black “Mike Callaham”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C41”]
[WhiteElo “1775”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
{Round 6. I’m feeling good and rested. It’s time to close the deal. Just
taking it round by round and trying to stay on procedure. I looked up every
opponent’s history before the game. How many games, how have they performed
against higher rated players, and what is the sum total of their experience.
Here, we enter a Philidor. We kept it level for a while but then I slowly
managed to pull away. Then some full board play gets me the advantage. A
nice game.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bc4 Be7 6. O-O O-O

world open 6-1Diagram # Everyone knows the Philidor up to this point. Now they have all the other openings going through their heads. They can play Qe2, Qd3, Re1, a3, a4, Bb3, Be2, Be3, Bg5, h3, de, b3, b4, and Nh4. The more common of those choices appear in other openings. While there are several books on the Philidor, none of them really explain where the white pieces are supposed to be placed and  where the black pieces should not be allowed to get to. If you want to read my article on the Philidor, go to http://www.vachess.org and download or view newsletter 2010-1. Of course I kept a few things to myself, but I’d be willing to explain more to anyone that comes by the club or contacts me. The most instructive part of the article is, “The Plan”!! If you can find a comparable way to explain any opening you are playing, your chances of success with that opening will skyrocket!! 7. Re1 c6 8. a4 Qc7 9. b3!? This is Alekhine’s idea. This line was published in the 1953 book that originally got me interested in the Philidor.  h6 10. Bb2 Re8 11. Bf1?!  Don’t retreat! That gives equality. Fritz actually approves of black’s next move. Nf8 12. g3 Ng6 13. Bg2world open 6-2Every double fianchetto player will tell you, this set up is wrong. You shouldn’t double fianchetto and have the knights on f3 and c3 or the knights on f6 and c6. In a double fianchetto, one of the wing pawns must stay mobile to attack the center and force the center pawns to move or exchange to open lines for the bishops!? Here, the center pawns are no match for black and he can choose to fight on either wing because his pawn structure is fluid and the opponent’s pawn structures are identical and static.} a5 14.
Re2 The jig is up! I am 100% sure my opponent doesn’t have a plan and is stalling. My next move is really designed at putting my rook on d8 and then moving the bishop again to clear the file. It looks like I’m just trying to develop but I’m not. It looks like I don’t have anything to do either but I do. This kind of hidden purposeful play can put your opponents to sleep and/or take tons of time of their clock. When I’m playing the Philidor I move slowly until were castled and then I make my opponent calculate and plan on their own time. Any opening you know as well as I described earlier can be used in this manor!  Bd7 15. d5 Rad8 16. dxc6?world open 6-3The 1st real mistake. White can’t exchange on e5 because black controls d5 but white
doesn’t control d4. Here white reduces the number of spaces his pawns control
in the center with no compensation whatsoever. Now black can plan his center
expansion knowing that the challengers to that expansion are stuck behind the
knights. If the knights move to stop the expansion, they have to go to the 1st or 2nd rank. I think if that happens the bishop pair will die and the weaknesses left behind will give black targets since the knights will have no forward outposts!? (16. Qd3 h5 17. h4 Bg4 18. Rd1 Nf8=world open 6-4Ba3=, Rb1=, Ree1=, Rdd2=, Red2=, Qe3=, Qd2=, Qc4=, Ra1=, Rf1=, Rde1=, Kh1=. when I say equal, I mean equal. lol ) 16… bxc6 Black now has the initiative! 17. Rd2 Be6?! Wrong way?! Should have put it on c8 like I originally planned. 18. Qe2 Bg4 (18… d5 seemed rushed to me, and after 19. exd5 Bxd5 20. Re1 Bf8 21. Nxd5 cxd5 22. Rc1 Bc5 or (22… Ne4 23. Rdd1 Bc5 24. Rf1 isn’t really accomplishing anything.) 23. Rdd1 Qb6 24. Bh3 Re7 25. Bf5 e4 26. Nd4 Ne5 27. Bc3 Under analysis, this does show how the bishops can play out of the holes!) 19. h3 Bc8 20. Rad1 Rd7 21. Nh2 Qb6 22. Nf1 Ba6 23. Qe3 Qb8world open 6-5The last 5 moves have been like watching 2 computers play. lol it’s stil =,=,= and more equal!! 24. Kh2 Bd8 25. Ba3 {?!} Bb6 26. Qf3?  Mistakes come in what? Pairs!?} (26. Qe1 Qa7 27. Ne3 Bc5 or (27… Bd4 28. Na2 Qb6 29. Nf5 d5 30. Nxd4 exd4 31. Rxd4 c5 32. R4d2 Nxe4 or (32… d4 33. Nc1 (33. f4 h5 34. f5 Ne5 35. Nc1 Rde7 36. c3 Nxe4 37. cxd4 Nxd2 38. Qxd2 Rd7 39. Bxc5 Qc7 40. Qg5 h4 41. Rg1=) 33. Rxd5 Rxd5 34. Rxd5 Nf6 35. Bxc5 Qc7 36. Bd6 Rxe1 37. Bxc7 Nxd5 38. Bxd5 Re2 39. Bxa5 Rxf2+ 40. Kg1 Rxc2 41. Nb4 Rc1+ 42. Kf2 Rf1+ 43. Kg2 Rf5 44. Nxa6 Rxd5 45. b4  Black has a slight edge, but everybody better get over there!) 28. Bxc5 Qxc5 29. Nc4 Bxc4 30. bxc4 Qxc4 31. Rxd6 Rxd6 32. Rxd6 Nf8 33. Bf1 Qc5 34. Rd1 Rb8 35. Kg2 Ne6 {Black has the edge but it’s all still real tough to quantify!)
26… d5!?world open 6-6This sets an obvious trap! The queen has one escape square, so taking on d5 really isn’t an option!  On the other hand I could have tried the straight forward Bd4, but I knew he was going to chop it just to relieve the pressure! The other factor plays out in analysis that sooner or later I have to give back a piece for some pawns. So it would just be equal anyway and I couldn’t see any advantage in that. The piece is active and I want to keep it for a while. (26… Bd4 27. Rxd4 exd4 28. Rxd4 c5 29. Rd1 Ne5 30. Qf5 c4 31. Nd2 or (31. f4? This traps the queen! Nfg4+ 32. hxg4 g6 33. Qxd7 Nxd7 34. bxc4 ) 31… cxb3 32. Nxb3 Qc7 33. Bb2 Bc4 34. Nd4 Qb6 35. Ndb5 Be6 36. Qf4 Rcholding on to a nagging advantage!) 27. Bh1?? This is not good better would have been (27. Ne3 d4 28. Nf5 Kh7 29. Ne2 Nf8 30. Bxf8 Rxf8 Finally compelling him to part with a bishop would have been good for now!) ( 27. exd5 {?? The trap} e4 28. Qf5 Re5 29. Qxd7 Nxd7 30. dxc6 Nf6 31. Bd6 Qe8
32. Bxe5 Qxe5 {He didn’t fall for it. Ne3 isn’t that easy to see either until
you realize that black’s pawn is pinned and you’ve got the kingside threats of
Nf5 and Nh6 and Qf6 until black breaks the pin! That’s why I always say, ” On
your turn spend time looking to see what you can do to them 1st!! Then look
and see what they can do to you!}) 27… Bd4 28. Bb2? Mistakes come in pairs!! Red8? Sometimes triples!?} (28… Bxf1 29. Rxf1 Nxe4 30. Rxd4 exd4 31. Nxe4 dxe4 32. Qg4 Ne5 33. Qxe4 c5 34. Qf4 Rde7 35. Ba3 Qb6 36. Bg2 {and I’d have gotten what I call, ” The static exchange” I got him to exchange rook for bishop, but there’s no other obvious advantage.) 29. Ba1 Qc7?! world open 6-7This gives back a lot, but I just liked everyone where they were. The trap is gone and now ed is the best move. That’s funny. lol 30. Qg2?? (30. exd5 cxd5 31. Nb5 I’d always considered he’d take the Bishop too.  (31. Rxd4 exd4 32. Nb5 Bxb5 33. axb5 This is a must move in both lines. The knight going back to d4 is definitely a better blockader than the Bishop! Qxc2 34. Bxd4 Ne4 35. Bg2 Ng5 36. Qd3 Qxd3 37. Rxd3 Ne6) 31… Bxb5 32. axb5 Bxa1 33. Rxa1 Ne4 34. Qd3 Nxd2 35. Qxd2 Another static exchange!) 30… Bxc3 31. Bxc3 Nxe4 32. f3?? or (32. Qf3 f5 (32… Nxd2 33. Bxd2 c5 34. Qc3 Bxf1 35. Rxf1 Ra8 36. Qd3 e4 37. Qe2 Ne5 38. f3 exf3 39. Bxf3 Nxf3+ 40. Rxf3 is winning.) 33. Re1 Rd6 34. Rdd1 f4 35. Nd2 Qb6 36. gxf4 Nxc3 37. Qxc3 Qxf2+ 38. Bg2 Nxf4 39. Qf3 Qh4 40. Qg4 Qf6 works for me too!) 32… Nxc3 33. Re1 e4 34. Rf2 Nh4world open 6-8A move from the Philidor campaign as late as move 34!! At this point, it’s time to take as much material as I can and then exchange down to a won ending.} 35. Qg1 exf3 36. Bxf3 Ne4 37. Bxe4 dxe4 38. Re3 Nf3+ 39. Rexf3 exf3 40. Rxf3 Bxf1 41. Rxf1 Rd2+ 42. Kh1 Qd6 43. Qa7 Qd5+ 44. Kg1 Qg2# It was a game right out of the Philidor campaign. This brought me to 5.5 out of 6! Still got 3 games left.  Time for my CBD and a nap to get ready for round 7.

World Open Round 2

[Event “World Open U1800”]
[Site “Richmond”]
[Date “2019.07.04”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Anand Gupta”]
[Black “Mike C”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “A55”]
[WhiteElo “1642”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
[PlyCount “118”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. e4 e5 5. Nf3 Be7 6. Be2 c6 7. O-O O-O world open 2-1{This is the standard position in, “The Old Indian”. There are several
kingside and queenside plans but I’m partial to the Callaham Attack! b2-b3
comes in later after Qc2, h3, Be3, Rb1, a2, Qd3, and Re1. They all concede
white a slight edge, (+=). The thing is, do you have a campaign. I have 34
things that have to dissapear from possibility before I don’t know what to
do!!! As a result, my opponents will get into time trouble because they must
plan and calculate using only their own time.} 8. b3 Qc7 9. Ba3  {This is not the right move. The diagonal just isn’t that important plus the pawn
structure is still fluid enough to handle the bishop and make it move again
for a good diagonal!} Qa5 {The computer said to move a rook or a pawn. Watch
your computer when it’s top recommendations are rook moves! Their whole line
comes suspect!} 10. Qc1 Re8 11. b4 Qc7 world open 2-2 12. d5  {Releasing the tension?! To me it appears as though white has chosen the Queenside for our skirmish.} (12. Rd1 Nf8 13. h3 h6 14. b5 Ne6 ) 12… h6 13. Rd1 Nf8  {
This is where I choose the Kingside for my skirmish! world open 2-10This is a very complicated position to navigate without a campaign! He showed me that he’s been was having difficulties since move 9. He has to commit! The choices are c5=, g3=, Qd2=, Qb2=,Bf1=. Rb1=, h4+, b5=, dc+, Nh4=, Qc2=, and Qe3=.} 14. Qc2 a5 15. b5
c5  (15… cxd5  16. b6 Qxb6 17. Nxd5 Nxd5 18. cxd5 Ng6 19. Rab1 Qa7 ) 16. Rd2  {Which of these three computer suggested 16th moves would have been easier to find? Bc1, Ne1, or Rb1.}  g5 {I know this plan is risky, but my opponent must know how to defend or face serious danger!} (16… Ng6 17. g3 Bh3 18. Nd1 h5 19. Ne3 Ng4 20. Nf5 h4 21. Rd3 hxg3 22. Nxe7+ Qxe7 23. hxg3 f5. see diagram below)world open 2-317. Rad1 (17. h4 $1 N6h7 18. b6 Qxb6 19. hxg5 Nxg5 20. Rb1 Qd8
21. Na4 Ra6 22. Nxg5 Bxg5 23. Rdd1 Ng6 24. g3 $14) 17… Ng6 18. Ne1 b6 19. Bf1 Kg7 20. Bc1 Bd7 21. Ne2 Nh5 22. g3 Rg8 23. Ng2 Raf8 24. Ne3 Bd8 25. Nf5+ Kh7 {Too many choices isn’t it!?} 26. Rd3  Ne7 {I know it looks weird but I can show you the vote chess game that made this move easy to swallow!} 27. g4 Nf4 world open 2-5

White must move the rook or give black the initiaitive! All lines lead to Rg3.} 28. Nxf4  (28. Re3 Neg6 29. Nxf4 Nxf4 (29… gxf4 30. Rh3 Nh4 $1 31. Be2 f3 32. Bxf3 Nxf3+ 33. Rxf3 Rxg4+ 34. Kh1 Bxf5 35. exf5 Rfg8 ) 30. Bg2 Bf6 31. Rg3 $13) 28… gxf4 29. Nxe7 Rxg4+ 30. Kh1 Bxe7 31. Bh3 Rg5 world open 2-6

White has to avoid exchanges at all cost while trying to re coordinate his forces!} 32. Rg1 Rxg1+ 33. Kxg1 Bxh3 34. Rxh3 Rg8+ 35. Kf1 Qd7

world open 2-736. Qc3 (36. Qd3 $8 Qg4 37. Bd2 f5 $1 38. Qf3 Qxf3 39. Rxf3 fxe4 40. Rh3 Bf6 41. Bc3 Kg7 42. Bd2 Kg6 43. Kg1 h5 44. Kh1 Bg5 45. Kg1 h4 46. Rb3 Kf5 47. Kf1 ) 36… Qg4 37. Bd2 Qg2+ 38. Ke2 Qxe4+ 39.
Kf1 Qg2+ 40. Ke2   {I didn’t realize the rook was trapped!} 

world open 2-8

f5 ( 40… e4  41. Bxf4 Qg4+ 42. Kd2 Qxf4+) 41. Qf3 Qg4 42. Qxg4 fxg4 43. Rb3 Kg6 44. Rb1 Kf5 $19 45. Bc3 e4 46. Rg1 Bf6 world open 2-9White tries to fight it off but the game is over in 11 moves} 47. Bd2
h5 48. Be1 h4 49. Bd2 Bg5 50. Be1 f3+ 51. Kd1 Bf4 52. Rh1 Rg5 53. Kc2 Rh5 54.
Kd1 e3 55. Kc2 Ke4 56. Bc3 exf2 57. Kd1 Bxh2 58. Kc2 Bg1 59. Bxa5 f1=Q 0-1

I’m now 2-0.  I’m just following procedure!!  Want to know what procedure that is, you have to stop by. lol

Ratings Under 1,000. There are No Davids or Goliaths!!

david-versus-goliath

It is always good for a laugh to hear players and parents talking about how good a 1,000 player is.  “Your next opponent is rated 968, be careful.”  or I’ll hear a player say, ” Her rating was really high, just over 1,000!).  ” I’ll do the best I can their rating is much higher than mine.”.  SHAME, SHAME, SHAME on parents and players alike for knowing so little about the rating system!  If you pay a coach and your player still thinks a 1,000 rating means anything, that’s even worse!!  Chess player egos are the most imagination driven egos in all of sports because the players, parents, and the coaches don’t make sure that everyone understands the rating system.  I explain the rating system pretty early on to my private students, and within a tournament or 2 to all the others!  If you don’t get to work at helping everyone understand the rating system, you are hurting your player’s growth.  Over or under 1,000, they should not be playing blind!

knife to a gun fight

Until you fully understand the ratings system, let’s talk about what to do when the pairings come up.  1) Look up the opponent’s history at USChess!  The “General” page will give their rating and category.  2.) Look at their, ” Tournament History” to see how many events they have played in and the highest their rating has been.  3.) Go back to the “General” page and click on “Game Statistics” to see the strongest players they’ve played and the result. 4.) click on, “Record by Year” to see total games, and winning percentage. If you do this the moment the postings come out, you will not be late for the round.  Even if you are late, it’s worth a minute or 2 to gather this info so that your player get’s the correct perspective on their opponent!

a-funny-t-rex-pictures-epic-duel

This past weekend the VSCA held a tournament at Maggie Walker High School.  The player rated 908 finished with a perfect score of 4-0 and a new rating high of 1082.  I’ll bet that none of his opponent’s knew that this player’s rating had fallen from 1077 in July of 2018, that they’ve only played 44 tournament games and that their record against opponents rated 1,000 or higher was a dismal 1 point out of 8 tries!  If you look at all of your previous opponents that have a rating of 1,000 or lower, you will find that none of them have a positive record against players rated over 1,000!  The next player finishing with 3.5 watched their rating go from 887 to 968.  They’ve played 75 tournament games.  they have 1 point out of 5 tries.  The player that took 3rd with 3.5 points, watched their rating go from 687 to 964!!  They’ve played 51 games, seen a player over 1,000 only twice and lost both times.  One player at the tournament who’s rating was 948 at the beginning of the tournament has played 131 tournament games met players over 1,000 only 9 times and has a score of 3.5 against those opponent’s.

tru-alien-vs-predaator-exclusive-063   The part that makes things confusing is the k factor, (http://www.uschess.org/content/view/12201/221/).  The K Factor tells what the maximum number of points a player can get for a win!  For players under 1,000 the K factor is 52 or more points.  For players at my rating high of 1943 the K factor is 27.5 points!  What that means is even if I had scored 3.5 points against players that were rated 235, 198, 259, and 302 above my rating, my new rating would be just 2058.  I would have picked up just 115 points, not the 277 that the 687 player got for the same numerical results.

The next time you get paired with someone who’s rating is 1,000 or less just remember, you are supposed to respect your opponent, not put faith in them!!  The 964 of today may have been 687 of just 4 games ago!  Learn the rating system, play intelligently, and know something about every opponent you play!

Young folks do battle at the Boy and Girls Club of Greater Richmond

On Saturday July 29th children from the Boys and Girls club of Greater Richmond.  The 4 contestants were Christopher Collins, Anton Wilson, Iyana Scroggins, and London Rise.  The play format was a Quad.  This is an everyone plays everyone setting.

Here, 12 year old Head Coach for Boushall Middle School, Giovonnie Pearson watches the board as an assistant referee. G-Man as he is called is ensuring that the game is recorded and that if a piece is touched and the player wants to make a claim, there will be no disputes.

3x weighted pieces, vinyl board, and quiver are winners choice.

Books, clocks and hats were also for the taking for winners

What a selection!

After 2 rounds of grueling battle Alton has 1.5, Christopher has 1.5, Iyana has 1, and London has 0.  What’s always good recovery food after a couple games of tournament chess?  That’s right ……… Pizza

Papa John’s pizza is comfort food!

When the battle is done, Alton and Christopher are tied for 1st, Iyana get’s second and London takes 3rd!

Christopher and Alton tied for 1st and were both allowed to pick a 1st place prize

the whole happy gang

Get your kids involved with RCI!  We have it all.  World class instruction, free weekly workshops at our own office, work and community service opportunities for the kids, and tournaments to test and document their skill.  Hope to see you at our, “Fearless Tournament Openings” camp, August 14th – 18th right here at Create Space.  Your tournament player will definitely thank you.