World Open, Game 1

[Event “World Open U 1800”]
[Site “Richmond”]
[Date “2019.07.05”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Mike C”]
[Black “Chloe Gaw”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “D00”]
[WhiteElo “1741”]
[BlackElo “1577”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
[PlyCount “85”]

{This is round 1 of the 2019 World Open. I’ve been working on a variation of
the London. My opponent did not expect to get into it so early. As a result
this 9 yr old goes down 2 pawn from an opening trap and never gets back in the
game. Score 1-0-0} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6  world open 1-1

5. Nb5 {Can’t even give this any puncuation!} e5 6. Bxe5 Nxe5 7. dxe5 Ne4  {
This type of misguided ambition is going to cost her another pawn!} (7… Ng4
8. Nf3 a6 9. Nc3 d4 10. exd4 cxd4 11. Qxd4 Qxd4 12. Nxd4 Nxe5 13. O-O-O
Bc5 14. f4 Ng4 15. Bc4  {White will escape the fork by playing h1-e1 check.}
) 8. Qxd5 Qxd5 9. Nc7+ Kd8 10. Nxd5 Be6 11. Nf4 Bd7 12. Bc4 Ng5 13. Rd1 Ke8 14.
h4 Ne6 15. Ngh3

world open 1-2

h6 {My advantage was mainly static. By that I mean the material alone was the only advantage I had. This allows black to fall behind in development. You must develop when you are down or that’s strike 2!} (15… Be7 16. Nxe6 Bxe6 17. Bxe6 fxe6 18. Nf4 Kf7 19. Rd7 b5  { White is still winning but that tempo was worth a whole pawn.}) 16. Nxe6 Bxe6 17. Bxe6 fxe6 18. Nf4 Kf7 (18… Rc8 19. Nxe6 Rc6 20. Nf4 Rb6 21. b3 Ra6 22. a4
c4 23. Ke2 Be7 24. Nd5 Kf7 25. f4 ) 19. Rd7+ Be7

world open 1-3

20.Rxb7 (20. Rh3  {Development is an all game thing and must be done even when you have the advantage. The game would have been over faster with this move.}) 20… Rhb821. Rxb8 Rxb8 22. b3 c4 world open 1-4 23. Ne2  {This allows black a glimmer of hope. h4-h5! was a lot faster and stronger. What’s key is to see b8-b5 coming and not lose the pawn!} Rb5 24. f4 Ra5 25. a4 cxb3 26. cxb3 Rd5 27. Kf2 Rd2

world open 1-5 28. Rc1  (28. Kf3 g6 29. Rc1 Bd8 30. Nd4 Bb6 31. Nb5 Rd3 32. Rc3 ) 28… Bxh4+ 29. Kf3 Rd7 30. Nd4 Bd8 31. Rc6 Re7 32. b4 Bb6 33. Nb5 
{picking off the a pawn will be the nail in the coffin!} Ke8 34. a5 Bd8 35. Ra6
Kf8 36. Rxa7 Rxa7 37. Nxa7 Ke8 38. Nb5 Kd7 39. a6 Kc6 40. Nd4+ Kb6 41. Nxe6 Be7
42. b5 g6 43. e4world open 1-6  {They played for another 18 moves but its over!} 1-0 1 down 7 to go!  Enjoy!

K-8 Kids being coached by 16 yr old and 6 yr old Coaches, takes 2nd in the k-12

may vsca 3.jpg

This has been a fun session at Next Up, Lucille Brown.  Jason Moorefield 16,  Anagha Sinkar 6, and their parents really deserve all the credit for this.  Jason is a SCBC Master Coach.  You become a Master Coach by coaching 100 sessions.  Jason was actually number 114 in the World, Under 16, until his recent birthday.  Anagha is 18th for girls under 7 in the US.  They alternate Tues and Thursdays as the coaching team of Lucille Brown Middle School.  This past weekend at the Meadowdale Spring Tournament, Nazerria Thomas and Laiyla Joseph teamed up to bring home 2nd place in the combined middle and high school section of this national tournament!!   Laiyla (R) making her sixth tournament appearance in 6 months knocked of a career high 639 player to get herself an individual medal performance.  Nazerria (l) was appearing in her 1st US chess tournament. By the way Coach Anagha played in the k-5 section and finished 1st with a perfect score of 4-0!  It was all girl power this weekend!  Hats off to the ladies!!!

Nazerria Thomas and Cole Felix are looking forward to Scholarship Chess Business Center’s summer work program.  From late June until mid August, selected Rated Tournament Chess Players will be trained in Business to Business  Marketing, Fund Raising, and Chess Coaching.  Our goal is to show them that they can earn money now and get ready for college.  Successful kids coaching successful kids.   Let’s see what’s next!?

Rated Tournament Chess Players nationwide, of any age, looking for work may contact Mike Callaham @ 804-426-6058