Coaching Saves Time, Money, and Effort! 5 slots left!

That’s not so bold a claim once you get to know us and what we are about. We’re Coaches not instructors, teachers, or relatives. It doesn’t matter what you want to become good at, hiring a coach is supposed to increase efficiency! The thing is, most people teaching chess are to, “Authoritative” in their approach. The most important thing to the student is, not losing!! To say the most important thing is winning is just as naive!!

Today I needed to get some papers notarized. I didn’t feel like carrying my briefcase so I grabbed the August issue of Chess Life Kids and stuffed it in there. As I was closing the mag, I saw this:

Hats off to these kids and parents that are out there making it happen. There’s no reason for someone not to catch fire at this time in the worlds history! I’m predicting a continual increase in the number of chess players during the pandemic.

OK, Here is how coaching saves money, effort, and time!?! I went and checked the US Chess histories of all of the kids in the article. 8 of the 9 kids that got the correct answer are rated!! I think there should have been way more contestants than 9! So here is there stats and my, “Coaches evaluation;

Luger #1 on the 8 yr old list. His current rating is 1821. His record against 1600, 1700, and 1800 players is 9 wins out of 49 games. He has not achieved a category of any kind. With a 60% win ratio he has played 182 games. He has not really been tested yet! At this stage, he should have had that record against 1800, 1900, and 2000 players. Koganov is 12 and did not make his top 100 list because his rating is 1626 and your rating has to be 1795 to get on that list. He is a Category 3 player! The only way to get a category result without a perfect score is to play up! You must earn 5 category results to be awarded a category! He’s played 302 games. This kid has the heart of a lion. He’s played 89 games against players rated 1500 or more. He only won 17 games, but what impressed me was that he had 21 draws. Why is that impressive to a coach? It means he knows how to protect the point!! He was playing up and protected 38 out of those 89 games. Moss is 10 and he could not get on the age 10 list since his rating is 1222 and the minimum is 1548. Moss has not achieved any category results at all. In the last 12 months he has only played 28 games against players rated more than 1200 and was able to get 5 wins and 0 draws. He needs to be playing up! Petukhov is 8 and comes in at number 48 on the 8 yr old list! His rating is 1287! He has played just 74 games and this year he’s only lost 3 out of 17. He needs to be playing up all the time. Whether its study, coaching, natural ability or a combination, he and Koganov look like excellent potential students. Vellore is 9 years old with a rating of 1451. That places him at 88 on the 9 yr old list. He’s achieved a Category 4 putting him on the map as someone that will play up. 1451 for a 9 yr old is usually time to rejoice but in this case he was in the 1400’s when he was 8 and when he was 7!!. In Aug of 2018 he was number 13 for kids under 7 and in August of 2019 he was number 80!! It’s a shame that with his level of interest that he’s not getting the attention he deserves!! His winning percentage is just 43%. Someone has to begin to hold him accountable. He has played 715 career games and he’s 9. That’s just way too many. If someone doesn’t help him he’ll continue to stagnate and quit. Bass is 10 years old with a rating of 1282. He’s on fire! He has acheived this rating with just 39 tournament games! His record is 28-10 with no draws. The only thing to be said about this is great job!! Play up and start looking for that draw!
Su has career is just 5 games, De Melo a career of just 4 games, and Rutowski are not rated!

So there you have it;

24 events, 39 games, 1282

14 events, 74 games, 1287

91 events, 182 games, 1821

88 events, 244 games, 1222

83 events, 301 games, 1626

287 events, 715 games, 1451

By the way, of the 8 that are rated none of them have become Certified Coaches or Certified Tournament Directors

I’ll never stop saying it…today’s players get their ratings from the number of games they are playing, not the strength of their play. They win and lose when they are supposed to and seldom challenge themselves to play up!! That makes all of them beatable!!

So, what would I do!?! Well, I’d need to consult with the player and the parents but if the idea is to get more points with less money, time, and effort, this would cover all of them!

1.) They’ve got to get the challenge set right! Most parents and players of all ages are using prize categories as success markers. The 1st Category that has a rating requirement is Expert/Candidate Master. Counting down you also have Category 1, 2, 3, and 4, players. So with that in mind, the real prize for each event is earning bonus points and achieving a Category result!! A tournament must have at least 4 rounds to qualify as a Category event!!

2.) You must invest time in understanding the rating system! We are on a fluctuating 200% margin system of error that spans 400 points! I know, but let me explain. When 2 players rated 1200 sit down to play each other, they have a 100% chance of beating each other, not a 50% chance of beating each other! When a 1200 sits down to play a 1300 you would think then that the 1200’s chances go down to 75% and the 1300’s chances of winning go to 125%!? Wrong!?! The odds of the 1300 winning are not 5-3. That’s a static evaluation. This is the fluctuating/dynamic part of the evaluation. The 1200’s chances went down to 87.5% and the 1300’s only went up to 112.5%! That means the odds were 9-7!! If a 1200 was playing a 1400, now it’s 75% and 125% and the odds are 5-3. A 1200 playing a 1500 is 62.5% vs 137.5%. That makes the odds 11-5. The points from a draw earned while playing up can sometimes equal what you’d have earned for beating an equal player!! I scored a Category 1 result in an under 2200 section with a score of 1/2/2. 1 win, 2 draws, and 2 loses. At the time, my rating was 1880. My opponents were 2100, 2106, 2099, 2113, and 2199. Yes I beat the 2199. It was 5 time West Virginia Champion, John Roush!! After the tournament, my rating was 1910!

3.) These players range from the top 30% to the top 10% of all the rated players in the country!! When it comes to chess, you must understand that they are not children anymore!? Yes, they are immature, childish, inconsistent etc. but, there are ways to help them understand the difference between toy time and tool time in chess.

4.) At the pace they are playing and because they are kids, it’s likely that they are not thoroughly analyzing their games. When I say thorough, I mean set the board up, verify that the score is accurate, then replay the game noting where there could have been improvements. Now, write down the lines of what you thought could happen. Finally, put the game on an engine and see what it says. Don’t skip any games no matter how much you think you know what happened!!!

If driving, meals, hotels, and entry fees have to be paid, which player do you want to have? What would really be bad is if all of these kids already have a, “Coach”!! Let us save you some trips. Private, Custom, Coaching is just a phone call away!! Mike Callaham, 804-426-6058!!

“Lose” Is Fired. Win and Draw Add up!!

Putting our new training system into a virtual classroom took longer than we thought and we sincerely apologize!  We were on fire before the pandemic hit!  Success in our 171 “New Schools Campaign”,  the launch of the “Scholarship Chess Business Center Management Group” on Facebook, our next  issue of Scholarship Chess Magazine was scheduled to be printed March 30th,  our coaches finished 2/61, 12/48, and 8/64 in the under 1800, under 2000, and open sections at the George Washington Open!!  I was scheduled to retake the MLO test at the end of March, and we’d just signed up with The Money Max  Account!! vacationWe knew the chess market could increase or decrease, but never expected a national shutdown that involved social distancing!! We wound up in the same position as everyone else… wishing we’d invested every dime we had into Zoom stocks. tired 2Converting in person, custom group lessons to custom group video lessons is hard work!!  We had to transition a lot of original concepts and reevaluate the nature of the delivery again to; instructor, teacher, and coach.  Then we had to find out what a good 90-120 minute presentation looked like, and finally we had to determine some minimum levels of performance and some lofty goals. no-experience-neededThere’s no waiting in chess for anything!  Comforting students about losses is a contradiction of what you paid for and will actually slow them down!!  The biggest challenge participants and parents will ever face is, ” doing exactly as they are told”.  Our win and draw training system has a 7 yr old as one of the coaches!!   The only experience our students need to win and draw chess games is being good at, “doing exactly what they are told”!   Making our own mistakes is no longer required.

After completion of our courses, the only question you need to answer after a game is, “Did I do exactly what I was told to do all the time, most of the time, some of the time, or not at all.  Students up to 1600 will win all of their games with an, “all” answer, they will win most of their games with a, “most” answer, some of their games with a, “some” answer!!  A, “not at all” answer means they don’t need any more classes right now!!

 

With events cancelling all over the country we put serious thought into what would be the new measuring stick for success!!  With no real world events, the toy parts, entertaining parts, and intriguing parts of chess must be used to produce the same results as serious study!  Chess.com is the perfect venue for improving players to have toys and tools!  Look for suggested Chess.com accomplishments for class placement.

measure 2

Next we conquered the challenge of groupings!  We offer a range of instruction for 2 groups.  The novice/intermediate, and the intermediate/tournament.

1.) Novice/Intermediates:  The goal is to decrease the number of tactical errors in the 1st 6-9 moves of the game.  We’ll teach, instill, practice, and test on our elements of tactics, strategy, and move selection.  Chess between classes is encouraged, explained, and reviewed, but the work is not a requirement.  Participants that do the work will have more confidence,  understanding, and stamina!  Their Chess.com training will focus on tactical exercises, puzzles, and reviewing their own games.

2.) Intermediates/Tournament:  The goal for these players is detecting tactical and strategic errors in the 1st 7-12 moves of the game.  This group will be shown what to study and how to study for extremely fast and tangible progress!  Work between classes is encouraged, explained, and reviewed.  Participants that do the work will have more self reliance, play more accurately, and be able to explain how they navigated all parts of the game.  Their Chess.com training will focus on openings analysis, understanding the rating system, the next level of our win/draw system, and how to evaluate their own performances.

Their 100 puzzle test should have an accuracy of 65% or better.  Puzzle Rating, 1400!  Their 3 minute, 5 minute, and Survival Puzzle Rush should approach 10, 14, and 18 respectively.  By comparison, my high for puzzles is 2463 and my Puzzle Rush are 21, 32, and 42!

evolution    square

Our delivery methods and systems are not the only thing that have evolved.  Many of our customers preferred cash to checks.  Many prefer using credit cards to writing checks.  With invoicing by, “Square”, it will be a neater and better communication for everyone!  It’s also a way for us to provide you updates and information about future classes and tournaments.

Classes:

Group 1.) lasts 1 hr 45 minutes, Group 2.) lasts 2 hrs. Class materials and delivery are continually customized to reflect the interest and skill of the participants!  Maximum class size is 10!  1st come, 1st served, no exceptions!  

Session 1

18 May – 10 June  Monday and Wednesday, Group 1.) 7 pm – 845 pm.

19 May – 11 June Tuesday and Thursday, Group 1.) 3 pm – 445 pm.

19 May – 11 June Tuesday and Thursday, Group 2.) 7 pm – 9 pm.

Session 2

15 June –  8 July Monday and Wednesday, Group 2.) 3 pm – 5 pm.

15 June – 8 July Monday and Wednesday, Group 1.) 7 pm – 845 pm.

16 June – 9 July Tuesday and Thursday, Group 1.) 3 pm –  445 pm.

16 June – 9 July Tuesday and Thursday, Group 2.) 7 pm – 9 pm.

Session 3

13 July – 5 August Monday and Wednesday, Group 2.) 3 pm – 5 pm.

13 July – 5 August Monday and Wednesday, Group 1.) 7 pm – 845 pm.

14 July – 6 August Tuesday and Thursday, Group 1.) 3 pm –  445 pm.

14 July – 6 August Tuesday and Thursday, Group 2.) 7 pm – 9 pm.

Session 4

10 August – 2 September Monday and Wednesday, Group 2.) 3 pm – 5 pm.

10 August – 2 September Monday and Wednesday, Group 1.) 7 pm – 845 pm.

11 August – 3 September Tuesday and Thursday, Group 1.) 3 pm –  445 pm.

11 August – 3 September Tuesday and Thursday, Group 2.) 7 pm – 9 pm.

Cost

Sign up for 1 session for just $89.00, 2 sessions just $159.00, 3 sessions just $229.00 and all 4 sessions is just $289.00.  To Register, please call or email us the students, name, number, email, class strength and day of the week.  Mike Callaham, 804-426-6058 and waterman2010kir@aol.com.  You will receive an invoice from Square with further instructions.

Thank You For Your Business,

Coach Mike Callaham

 

 

 

World Open U1800 Game 6

[Event “Worl Open U1800”]
[Date “2019.07.06”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Eric Tipton”]
[Black “Mike Callaham”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C41”]
[WhiteElo “1775”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
{Round 6. I’m feeling good and rested. It’s time to close the deal. Just
taking it round by round and trying to stay on procedure. I looked up every
opponent’s history before the game. How many games, how have they performed
against higher rated players, and what is the sum total of their experience.
Here, we enter a Philidor. We kept it level for a while but then I slowly
managed to pull away. Then some full board play gets me the advantage. A
nice game.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bc4 Be7 6. O-O O-O

world open 6-1Diagram # Everyone knows the Philidor up to this point. Now they have all the other openings going through their heads. They can play Qe2, Qd3, Re1, a3, a4, Bb3, Be2, Be3, Bg5, h3, de, b3, b4, and Nh4. The more common of those choices appear in other openings. While there are several books on the Philidor, none of them really explain where the white pieces are supposed to be placed and  where the black pieces should not be allowed to get to. If you want to read my article on the Philidor, go to http://www.vachess.org and download or view newsletter 2010-1. Of course I kept a few things to myself, but I’d be willing to explain more to anyone that comes by the club or contacts me. The most instructive part of the article is, “The Plan”!! If you can find a comparable way to explain any opening you are playing, your chances of success with that opening will skyrocket!! 7. Re1 c6 8. a4 Qc7 9. b3!? This is Alekhine’s idea. This line was published in the 1953 book that originally got me interested in the Philidor.  h6 10. Bb2 Re8 11. Bf1?!  Don’t retreat! That gives equality. Fritz actually approves of black’s next move. Nf8 12. g3 Ng6 13. Bg2world open 6-2Every double fianchetto player will tell you, this set up is wrong. You shouldn’t double fianchetto and have the knights on f3 and c3 or the knights on f6 and c6. In a double fianchetto, one of the wing pawns must stay mobile to attack the center and force the center pawns to move or exchange to open lines for the bishops!? Here, the center pawns are no match for black and he can choose to fight on either wing because his pawn structure is fluid and the opponent’s pawn structures are identical and static.} a5 14.
Re2 The jig is up! I am 100% sure my opponent doesn’t have a plan and is stalling. My next move is really designed at putting my rook on d8 and then moving the bishop again to clear the file. It looks like I’m just trying to develop but I’m not. It looks like I don’t have anything to do either but I do. This kind of hidden purposeful play can put your opponents to sleep and/or take tons of time of their clock. When I’m playing the Philidor I move slowly until were castled and then I make my opponent calculate and plan on their own time. Any opening you know as well as I described earlier can be used in this manor!  Bd7 15. d5 Rad8 16. dxc6?world open 6-3The 1st real mistake. White can’t exchange on e5 because black controls d5 but white
doesn’t control d4. Here white reduces the number of spaces his pawns control
in the center with no compensation whatsoever. Now black can plan his center
expansion knowing that the challengers to that expansion are stuck behind the
knights. If the knights move to stop the expansion, they have to go to the 1st or 2nd rank. I think if that happens the bishop pair will die and the weaknesses left behind will give black targets since the knights will have no forward outposts!? (16. Qd3 h5 17. h4 Bg4 18. Rd1 Nf8=world open 6-4Ba3=, Rb1=, Ree1=, Rdd2=, Red2=, Qe3=, Qd2=, Qc4=, Ra1=, Rf1=, Rde1=, Kh1=. when I say equal, I mean equal. lol ) 16… bxc6 Black now has the initiative! 17. Rd2 Be6?! Wrong way?! Should have put it on c8 like I originally planned. 18. Qe2 Bg4 (18… d5 seemed rushed to me, and after 19. exd5 Bxd5 20. Re1 Bf8 21. Nxd5 cxd5 22. Rc1 Bc5 or (22… Ne4 23. Rdd1 Bc5 24. Rf1 isn’t really accomplishing anything.) 23. Rdd1 Qb6 24. Bh3 Re7 25. Bf5 e4 26. Nd4 Ne5 27. Bc3 Under analysis, this does show how the bishops can play out of the holes!) 19. h3 Bc8 20. Rad1 Rd7 21. Nh2 Qb6 22. Nf1 Ba6 23. Qe3 Qb8world open 6-5The last 5 moves have been like watching 2 computers play. lol it’s stil =,=,= and more equal!! 24. Kh2 Bd8 25. Ba3 {?!} Bb6 26. Qf3?  Mistakes come in what? Pairs!?} (26. Qe1 Qa7 27. Ne3 Bc5 or (27… Bd4 28. Na2 Qb6 29. Nf5 d5 30. Nxd4 exd4 31. Rxd4 c5 32. R4d2 Nxe4 or (32… d4 33. Nc1 (33. f4 h5 34. f5 Ne5 35. Nc1 Rde7 36. c3 Nxe4 37. cxd4 Nxd2 38. Qxd2 Rd7 39. Bxc5 Qc7 40. Qg5 h4 41. Rg1=) 33. Rxd5 Rxd5 34. Rxd5 Nf6 35. Bxc5 Qc7 36. Bd6 Rxe1 37. Bxc7 Nxd5 38. Bxd5 Re2 39. Bxa5 Rxf2+ 40. Kg1 Rxc2 41. Nb4 Rc1+ 42. Kf2 Rf1+ 43. Kg2 Rf5 44. Nxa6 Rxd5 45. b4  Black has a slight edge, but everybody better get over there!) 28. Bxc5 Qxc5 29. Nc4 Bxc4 30. bxc4 Qxc4 31. Rxd6 Rxd6 32. Rxd6 Nf8 33. Bf1 Qc5 34. Rd1 Rb8 35. Kg2 Ne6 {Black has the edge but it’s all still real tough to quantify!)
26… d5!?world open 6-6This sets an obvious trap! The queen has one escape square, so taking on d5 really isn’t an option!  On the other hand I could have tried the straight forward Bd4, but I knew he was going to chop it just to relieve the pressure! The other factor plays out in analysis that sooner or later I have to give back a piece for some pawns. So it would just be equal anyway and I couldn’t see any advantage in that. The piece is active and I want to keep it for a while. (26… Bd4 27. Rxd4 exd4 28. Rxd4 c5 29. Rd1 Ne5 30. Qf5 c4 31. Nd2 or (31. f4? This traps the queen! Nfg4+ 32. hxg4 g6 33. Qxd7 Nxd7 34. bxc4 ) 31… cxb3 32. Nxb3 Qc7 33. Bb2 Bc4 34. Nd4 Qb6 35. Ndb5 Be6 36. Qf4 Rcholding on to a nagging advantage!) 27. Bh1?? This is not good better would have been (27. Ne3 d4 28. Nf5 Kh7 29. Ne2 Nf8 30. Bxf8 Rxf8 Finally compelling him to part with a bishop would have been good for now!) ( 27. exd5 {?? The trap} e4 28. Qf5 Re5 29. Qxd7 Nxd7 30. dxc6 Nf6 31. Bd6 Qe8
32. Bxe5 Qxe5 {He didn’t fall for it. Ne3 isn’t that easy to see either until
you realize that black’s pawn is pinned and you’ve got the kingside threats of
Nf5 and Nh6 and Qf6 until black breaks the pin! That’s why I always say, ” On
your turn spend time looking to see what you can do to them 1st!! Then look
and see what they can do to you!}) 27… Bd4 28. Bb2? Mistakes come in pairs!! Red8? Sometimes triples!?} (28… Bxf1 29. Rxf1 Nxe4 30. Rxd4 exd4 31. Nxe4 dxe4 32. Qg4 Ne5 33. Qxe4 c5 34. Qf4 Rde7 35. Ba3 Qb6 36. Bg2 {and I’d have gotten what I call, ” The static exchange” I got him to exchange rook for bishop, but there’s no other obvious advantage.) 29. Ba1 Qc7?! world open 6-7This gives back a lot, but I just liked everyone where they were. The trap is gone and now ed is the best move. That’s funny. lol 30. Qg2?? (30. exd5 cxd5 31. Nb5 I’d always considered he’d take the Bishop too.  (31. Rxd4 exd4 32. Nb5 Bxb5 33. axb5 This is a must move in both lines. The knight going back to d4 is definitely a better blockader than the Bishop! Qxc2 34. Bxd4 Ne4 35. Bg2 Ng5 36. Qd3 Qxd3 37. Rxd3 Ne6) 31… Bxb5 32. axb5 Bxa1 33. Rxa1 Ne4 34. Qd3 Nxd2 35. Qxd2 Another static exchange!) 30… Bxc3 31. Bxc3 Nxe4 32. f3?? or (32. Qf3 f5 (32… Nxd2 33. Bxd2 c5 34. Qc3 Bxf1 35. Rxf1 Ra8 36. Qd3 e4 37. Qe2 Ne5 38. f3 exf3 39. Bxf3 Nxf3+ 40. Rxf3 is winning.) 33. Re1 Rd6 34. Rdd1 f4 35. Nd2 Qb6 36. gxf4 Nxc3 37. Qxc3 Qxf2+ 38. Bg2 Nxf4 39. Qf3 Qh4 40. Qg4 Qf6 works for me too!) 32… Nxc3 33. Re1 e4 34. Rf2 Nh4world open 6-8A move from the Philidor campaign as late as move 34!! At this point, it’s time to take as much material as I can and then exchange down to a won ending.} 35. Qg1 exf3 36. Bxf3 Ne4 37. Bxe4 dxe4 38. Re3 Nf3+ 39. Rexf3 exf3 40. Rxf3 Bxf1 41. Rxf1 Rd2+ 42. Kh1 Qd6 43. Qa7 Qd5+ 44. Kg1 Qg2# It was a game right out of the Philidor campaign. This brought me to 5.5 out of 6! Still got 3 games left.  Time for my CBD and a nap to get ready for round 7.

World Open Game 5!!

[Event “2019 World Open U 1800”]
[Site “Richmond”]
[Date “2019.07.05”]
[Round “5”]
[White “Jiri janko”]
[Black “mike c”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “C30”]
[WhiteElo “1789”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
[PlyCount “86”]

This game holds a special place for me in that it’s a King’s Gambit Declined.
Over and over you will hear me say, “If it’s the King’s Gambit, decline it, if
it’s the Queen’s Gambit, accept it! your opponent will never remember the
theory!!”! The fun part about playing the King’s Gambit Declined is that
technically speaking it’s a counter gambit not a declination! He said go
ahead take on f4 I dare you and I said, not a chance, I dare you to take on e5.
When I see the move, I actually get a little insulted. The King’s Gambit has
been played for centuries, how dare you imply that I don’t know anything about
this most fundamental of openings. Since you want to test me, how about I
test you!!} 1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 This system is not, nor has it ever been in
fashion. I saw a book on it back in the 80’s from Chess Digest. I wish I had
bought it. It was a thematic tournament from the early 20th century. No book
I’ve ever seen on the King’s Gambit has ever been able to give a detailed
theoretical explanation of the ideas, piece placements, or strategies behind
the opening. This is one of the most complicated games I’ve ever analyzed.  You will need 2 boards to watch this game.  To help you out, I put the main sidelines in Italics.  How can my opponents be prepared?!} 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 a6!?N

world open 5-1Believe it or not, black has already equalized and stolen the initiative. The bishop will remain an annoying pest until white finds a way to trade it off or close the diagonal. The pawn they will actually have to gambit will be the d or b pawns to get equality. In the meantime black will make sure that safety on the queenside is also questionable!} 5. Bc4 (5. d4 exd4 6. Nxd4 Nf6 7. Be2 O-O 8. Be3 Bb4 9. O-O Bxc3 10. bxc3 Nxe4 11. Bf3 Re8
is good for black!) or  (5. fxe5 dxe5 6. Nxe5 Nf6 7. Ne2 Nxe4 8. d4 Bb4+ 9. c3 Bd6
10. Bf4 Nc6 11. Ng3 Nxg3 12. hxg3 Qe7 13. Qh5 g6 14. Qe2 Bxe5 15. dxe5 O-O 16.
O-O-O Be6 leaves black with a slight lead in development.) or (5. b4 Ba7 6. d4
exd4 7. Nxd4 Nf6 8. Be2 O-O 9. Be3 Qe7 10. Qd2 Bxd4 11. Bxd4 Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Qxe4
13. O-O Nc6 14. Bc3 {is equal again!) 5… Nf6 6. d3 Not in the spirit of the gambit at all! Nc6 7. h3 O-O 8. Qe2? Nh5 9. Qd1 Ng3 10. Rh2

world open 5-2

10. ..Nh5? (Better is 10… Nd4!?  {This was the 1st time during a tournament game I’d gotten this type of advantage. I didn’t fully take in that white’s king side castling option was forever gone when I calculated this move. If there is a next time, this analysis will leave me better prepared. The analysis is very interesting!} 11. f5 b5 12. Bb3 c6 13. h4 or (13. Nxd4 exd4 14. Qf3 dxc3 15. Qxg3 d5 16. bxc3 Bxf5 17. exf5 Re8+ 18. Kf1 Qe7
with a nice attack!!) or (13. Qd2 a5 14. a3 d5 15. h4 h6 16. Rh3 Nh5 17. Qd1 Nf6
and this retains all of the advantage!) 13… a5 14. Nxd4 exd4 15. Nd5 cxd5
16. Bxd5 Rb8 17. Qf3 Nxf5 18. exf5 Re8+ 19. Kf2 Re5 20. g4 h5 21. gxh5 Rxd5 22.
Qxd5 Bb7 23. Qb3 Qe8 24. Bf4 a4 and that wins!) 11. f5 Nd4 12. h4 Nf6 13. Bg5
c6 14. a3 b5 15. Ba2 a5

world open 5-3

The king side pawns are faster than they look. My opponent underestimated them! 16. Nb1? (16. g4! This move would have definitely been a game changer. One of us would have lost on time trying to figure out this mess. This is where analysis pays off! I will go over this position over and over again! It will help me fully understand the
workings of f5, h4 and the unprotected g4 push. There are landmines all over
the place in the complications that follow. In some lines black must part
with his queen to keep the advantage!! That’s true King’s gambit swashbuckling style!! Black’s advantage can be made minimal in some lines, some are totally unclear!. 16. …Ra7!?  This rook has to get protected and in the game! (16… Bb7?! 17. Rh3 Re8 18.
Bxf6 Qxf6 19. Ng5 Re7 20. Nxh7 Qh6 21. Ng5 Kf8 22. Qd2 Kg8 23. O-O-O Rd8 and white is back in the driver’s seat!) or (16… a4 17. Kf1 Bb7  or (17… Nxg4 18. Nxd4 Nxh2+ 19. Kg2 Qc7 20. Nxc6 Qxc6 21. Bd5 Qa6 22. Bxa8 Qxa8 This is almost equal even with white down a pawn!) 18. Rg2 Ba6 19. Bxf6 Qxf6 20. g5 Qe7 21. h5 Kh8 22. Nxd4 exd4 23. Ne2 Qe5 24. Qd2 d5 25. Ng3 dxe4 26. Nxe4 Qxf5+ 27. Qf2 Qxf2+ 28. Rxf2 Be7 with equal play as well!) 17. Rg2 Re8 18. Bxf6 Qxf6 19. g5 Qe7Analysis Diagram

world open 5-4

Both of the coming moves 20. g6!!, and 20. f6! are going to cause black to give up his queen to keep the advantage. I only want to study like this, but know I can play like this if I have to!} 20. g6!! best! (20. f6 Qd8 21. fxg7 Kxg7 22. h5 With no way for white to infiltrate the dark squares, blacks position should hold. Kh8 23. h6 d5 24. exd5 cxd5 25. Bxd5 (25. Nxd5?? e4 26. Nxd4 Bxd4 27. dxe4 Rxe4+ 28. Kf1 Bh3 29. Qf3 Bxg2+ 30. Qxg2 Rae7 31. Nxe7 Rf4+ 32. Ke2 (32. Ke1 Qxe7+ 33. Kd1 Bb6 34. Be6 fxe6 35. Kc1 Rf2 36. Qh3 Qxg5+ 37. Kb1 Bd4 38. Qb3 a4 39. Qd3 e5 40. Qxb5 Qg8 41. Qd3 Qf7 42. Kc1 Qb7 43. b4) 32…Qxe7+ 33. Kd1 Bb6 34. Be6 Rd4+ 35. Kc1 Qxe6 {White is toast again}) 25… b4
26. axb4 axb4 27. Rxa7 bxc3 28. g6 Qxd5 29. Ng5 Qxg2 30. Nxf7+ Kg8 31. gxh7+
Kxh7 32. Ng5+ Kxh6 33. Rh7+ Kxg5 34. Rg7+ Kf6 35. Rxg2 The threats of 36. Rh8 and 36. cxb leave black winning.) 20… hxg6 21. Rxg6 Nxf5 22. Ng5 Nxh4 23. Bxf7+ Qxf7 24. Nxf7 Rxf7 25. Qh5 Nxg6 26. Qxg6 Re6 27. Qg5 Bf2+ 28. Kd2 Rh6 Analysis Diagram

world open 5-5

With an incredible battle on the horizon!!)

world open 5-6Game position after 16. Nb1

16… Re8?! (16… h6 17. Bxf6 Qxf6 18. g4 I didn’t play 16. h6 in an attempt to avoid this
position. After 18…d5 the queen has lots of room on the 6th and the center
can be busted open!! I’m humbly blown away! 18. …d5! 19. g5 Qd6 20. Nbd2 see diagram below where you see the Italics again! (20. gxh6 Qxh6 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. c3 Qf4 23. Rg2 Qxh4+ 24. Ke2 Bb6 25. Qe1 Qh5+ 26. Kd2 dxe4 27. Qg3 (27. dxe4 Qf3 28. Re2 Ba6 29. b4 Rfd8+ 30. Kc2 Bb7 31. Kb2 axb4 32. cxb4 Bd4+ {he’s toast!}) (27. Qxe4 Bxf5 28. Qe2 Qh6+ 29. Kc2 Rad8 30. Rg3 Rxd3 31. Rxd3 Rd8 32. Bxf7+ Kxf7 33. Qf1 Qg6 34. Nd2 Rxd3 35. Re1
Can’t believe how the center collapses and the way the other pieces are out of
the picture.) 27… Qh6+ 28. Qg5 Qxg5+ 29. Rxg5 Rd8 30. f6 Rxd3+ 31. Kc2 g6
32. Rxg6+ Kf8 33. Rg7 Ra7 34. Rh7 Rh3 35. Rxh3 Bxh3 Wow! this is winning!) or  (
20. Rg2 Bxf5!! 21. exf5 (21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. c3 dxe4 23. cxd4 Qxd4 24. dxe4
Qxe4+ 25. Qe2 Qxh4+ 26. Qf2 hxg5 {That’s a lot of pawns!}) 21… Nxf5 22. Qd2
Ne3 23. Rg1 hxg5 24. hxg5 e4 25. dxe4 Qf4 26. Qc3 dxe4 27. g6 Nc4 28. Bxc4 (28.
Nd4 Qc1+ 29. Kf2 Qf4+ 30. Ke1 fxg6 31. Bxc4+ bxc4 32. Qxc4+ Rf7 33. Kd1 Qf2 34.
Re1 Bxd4 {The tactics here are instructive and inspiring!}) 28… Qc1+ 29. Ke2
exf3+ 30. Kxf3 Qxg1 31. gxf7+ Kh7 32. Qe5 Qf2+ 33. Kg4 Qg2+ 34. Qg3 Qe4+ 35.
Qf4 Qxf4+ 36. Kxf4 bxc4 37. Kg3 Bd6+ 38. Kh3 Rxf7 This is so much fun to watch)

world open 5-7

20… Bxf5!! This one recurring sacrifice makes the whole system make sense.  After white’s f5, I must be ready to sac my c8 bishop at the right time if I can keep his king in the center!! 21. exf5 e4 22. dxe4 Qg3+ 23. Kf1 Nxf3 24. Nxf3 dxe4 25. Rg2 Qf4 26. gxh6 exf3 27. Rxg7+ Kh8 28. b4 axb4 29. axb4 Bb6 30. Qd3 Rxa2 31. Re1 Qxh4 32. Qxf3 Rxc2 33. Rg3 Rd8 34. h7 Qh2 35. Rg8+ Kxh7 36. Rg7+ Kh8 37. Re8+ Rxe8 38. Rg8+ Rxg8 39. Ke1 Rg1+ 40. Qf1 Rc1#) 17. Bxf6?! {White should redevelop
and hold on to this Ace to make me calculate it again, again, and again each
turn in the hope of me playing h6. The pawns are more and more dangerous the
closer he gets to being fully redeveloped! (17. g4 d5 18. c3 Nxf3+ 19. Qxf3
Ba6!?  This move is the only move I found easy to play. all the others give the game back!?

world open 5-8.jpg(19… Bb7?! 20. Nd2 b4 21. Bxf6 (21. Kf1?! bxa3 22. bxa3 d4 23.
Rb1 Ba6 24. cxd4 Qxd4 25. Ke2 Nd5!! 26. exd5 e4 27. Nxe4 Rxe4+ 28. Kd2 Rae8)
21… Qxf6 22. g5 Qd6 23. f6 bxa3 24. bxa3 Bxa3 25. fxg7 Kxg7 26. Rf2 Rf8 27.
Qf6+ Qxf6 28. gxf6+ Kg6 29. exd5 cxd5 30. Bxd5 Bxd5 31. Rxa3 and the board is still a mess! Black has retained the initiative.) (19… Ra7?! 20. Nd2 d4 21. cxd4 Bxd4 22. O-O-O a4 23. Rg2 Qe7 24. Bxf6 Qxf6 25. g5 Qd6 26. g6 hxg6 27. Rxg6 Be6 28. Bxe6 Rxe6 29. Rxg7+ Kxg7 30. fxe6 Qxe6  Looks equal but I don’t trust it. That passer looks really mean!) 20. Bxf6 Qxf6 21. g5 Qd6 22. h5 b4 23. h6 The computer likes it but I think it gives
control of all the colors of the board to black. g6 24. fxg6 Qxg6 25. Nd2 bxc3
26. bxc3 Rad8 27. c4 Bxa3! (27… d4?! 28. Rf2 Rb8 29. Qg3 Bc8 30. Qh4
Qd6 31. Bb3 Re7 32. Kf1 Reb7 33. Bd1 Qe6 34. Kg2 Rb2 35. Bh5 R8b7 36. Qg3 a4
It’s equal with a slight initiative and that’s it!) 28. cxd5 Bb4 29. Rc1 (29.
Re2 cxd5 30. Bxd5 Kh8 31. Rg2 Rxd5 32. exd5 Bxd3 33. Qe3 e4 Even this late, a king in the center is a bad thing!) 29… cxd5 30. Bxd5 Rxd5 31. exd5 Bxd3 32. Rc6 Qe4+ 33. Qxe4 Bxe4 34. Rb6 Bxd5 Hay makers all over the place but black keeps an edge.) 17… Qxf6 18. Ng5 ( 18. g4 Over and over again, this turns out to be the move to be feared and prepared for! This time it appears to be too little too late. d5 19. c3 Nxf3+ 20. Qxf3 Qd6 21. Nd2 Rd8 22. g5 b4 23. f6 bxc3 24. bxc3 Bxa3 25. Rb1 Rb8  Not at all like before. Very instructive!) 18… d5 19. c3 (19. g4 And again!
h6 20. Nxf7 Qxf7 21. c3 Qc7 22. cxd4 exd4 23. Rf2 Bd6 24. Kf1 Bg3
g4 was the way out, now it’s just the last hope!) 19… h6 20. cxd4 Bxd4?
( 20… exd4 21. Qh5 Bxf5 22. Qxf7+ Qxf7 23. Nxf7 Kxf7 24. Kf2
Blacks winning again!) 21. Nc3 hxg5 22. Qh5 g6?? This would have put a
nail in the coffin and I missed it. Both of us are in serious time trouble.
I still should have taken more time to just realize that keeping the files
closed ends the attack! (22… g4 23. Nd1 b4 24. Rc1 bxa3 25. bxa3 Ba6 26. Qg5
Bxd3 27. exd5 cxd5 28. Bxd5 Qd6 29. f6 g6 30. Nf2 Rac8 and we may not make it to the time control!!) 23. hxg5 gxh5 24. gxf6 b4 25. Ke2 Bxf5 {!!} 26. exf5 e4 27. Rxh5 Bxf6 28. Na4 bxa3 29. g4 axb2 30. Rah1 Bg7 31. g5 f6 {Diagram # I was feeling pretty bad here. I knew I was on the defense, but I had no Idea how much I’d blown, or how bad it was. We are both just glued to the table and trying to hold on before we run out of time! 32.
gxf6?? Bxf6 33. Rg1+ Kf8 34. Rh7 exd3+ 35. Kxd3 Re7 36. Rh6 Rf7 37. Rgh1 Ke7
38. Nc5 Rg8 39. Re1+ Kd8 40. Ne6+ Kc8 41. Nc5?? Always get up and walk off
the time control. He doesn’t and makes a mistake.} Rg3+ 42. Kc2?? or 2 (42.
Ke2 Kc7 43. Bb1 a4! 44. Reh1 a3 45. Ne6+ Kd7 46. Rd1 Rg2+ 47. Ke3 Be5 48.
Rg6 Rc2 49. Bxc2 a2 50. Nc5+ Kc7 51. Nb3 Rh7 52. Rgg1 Rh3+ 53. Ke2 Rh2+ 54. Kd3
c5 55. Nxc5 a1=Q 56. Rxa1 bxa1=Q 57. Rxa1 Bxa1 58. Ne6+ Kd6 {
With a long but theoretically won ending.}) 42… Rc3+ 43. Kxb2 Rxc5+
All I can say is, “What a game!!! I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. 0-1