World Open, Game 1

[Event “World Open U 1800”]
[Site “Richmond”]
[Date “2019.07.05”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Mike C”]
[Black “Chloe Gaw”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “D00”]
[WhiteElo “1741”]
[BlackElo “1577”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]
[PlyCount “85”]

{This is round 1 of the 2019 World Open. I’ve been working on a variation of
the London. My opponent did not expect to get into it so early. As a result
this 9 yr old goes down 2 pawn from an opening trap and never gets back in the
game. Score 1-0-0} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6  world open 1-1

5. Nb5 {Can’t even give this any puncuation!} e5 6. Bxe5 Nxe5 7. dxe5 Ne4  {
This type of misguided ambition is going to cost her another pawn!} (7… Ng4
8. Nf3 a6 9. Nc3 d4 10. exd4 cxd4 11. Qxd4 Qxd4 12. Nxd4 Nxe5 13. O-O-O
Bc5 14. f4 Ng4 15. Bc4  {White will escape the fork by playing h1-e1 check.}
) 8. Qxd5 Qxd5 9. Nc7+ Kd8 10. Nxd5 Be6 11. Nf4 Bd7 12. Bc4 Ng5 13. Rd1 Ke8 14.
h4 Ne6 15. Ngh3

world open 1-2

h6 {My advantage was mainly static. By that I mean the material alone was the only advantage I had. This allows black to fall behind in development. You must develop when you are down or that’s strike 2!} (15… Be7 16. Nxe6 Bxe6 17. Bxe6 fxe6 18. Nf4 Kf7 19. Rd7 b5  { White is still winning but that tempo was worth a whole pawn.}) 16. Nxe6 Bxe6 17. Bxe6 fxe6 18. Nf4 Kf7 (18… Rc8 19. Nxe6 Rc6 20. Nf4 Rb6 21. b3 Ra6 22. a4
c4 23. Ke2 Be7 24. Nd5 Kf7 25. f4 ) 19. Rd7+ Be7

world open 1-3

20.Rxb7 (20. Rh3  {Development is an all game thing and must be done even when you have the advantage. The game would have been over faster with this move.}) 20… Rhb821. Rxb8 Rxb8 22. b3 c4 world open 1-4 23. Ne2  {This allows black a glimmer of hope. h4-h5! was a lot faster and stronger. What’s key is to see b8-b5 coming and not lose the pawn!} Rb5 24. f4 Ra5 25. a4 cxb3 26. cxb3 Rd5 27. Kf2 Rd2

world open 1-5 28. Rc1  (28. Kf3 g6 29. Rc1 Bd8 30. Nd4 Bb6 31. Nb5 Rd3 32. Rc3 ) 28… Bxh4+ 29. Kf3 Rd7 30. Nd4 Bd8 31. Rc6 Re7 32. b4 Bb6 33. Nb5 
{picking off the a pawn will be the nail in the coffin!} Ke8 34. a5 Bd8 35. Ra6
Kf8 36. Rxa7 Rxa7 37. Nxa7 Ke8 38. Nb5 Kd7 39. a6 Kc6 40. Nd4+ Kb6 41. Nxe6 Be7
42. b5 g6 43. e4world open 1-6  {They played for another 18 moves but its over!} 1-0 1 down 7 to go!  Enjoy!

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K-8 Kids being coached by 16 yr old and 6 yr old Coaches, takes 2nd in the k-12

may vsca 3.jpg

This has been a fun session at Next Up, Lucille Brown.  Jason Moorefield 16,  Anagha Sinkar 6, and their parents really deserve all the credit for this.  Jason is a SCBC Master Coach.  You become a Master Coach by coaching 100 sessions.  Jason was actually number 114 in the World, Under 16, until his recent birthday.  Anagha is 18th for girls under 7 in the US.  They alternate Tues and Thursdays as the coaching team of Lucille Brown Middle School.  This past weekend at the Meadowdale Spring Tournament, Nazerria Thomas and Laiyla Joseph teamed up to bring home 2nd place in the combined middle and high school section of this national tournament!!   Laiyla (R) making her sixth tournament appearance in 6 months knocked of a career high 639 player to get herself an individual medal performance.  Nazerria (l) was appearing in her 1st US chess tournament. By the way Coach Anagha played in the k-5 section and finished 1st with a perfect score of 4-0!  It was all girl power this weekend!  Hats off to the ladies!!!

Nazerria Thomas and Cole Felix are looking forward to Scholarship Chess Business Center’s summer work program.  From late June until mid August, selected Rated Tournament Chess Players will be trained in Business to Business  Marketing, Fund Raising, and Chess Coaching.  Our goal is to show them that they can earn money now and get ready for college.  Successful kids coaching successful kids.   Let’s see what’s next!?

Rated Tournament Chess Players nationwide, of any age, looking for work may contact Mike Callaham @ 804-426-6058

Ratings Under 1,000. There are No Davids or Goliaths!!

david-versus-goliath

It is always good for a laugh to hear players and parents talking about how good a 1,000 player is.  “Your next opponent is rated 968, be careful.”  or I’ll hear a player say, ” Her rating was really high, just over 1,000!).  ” I’ll do the best I can their rating is much higher than mine.”.  SHAME, SHAME, SHAME on parents and players alike for knowing so little about the rating system!  If you pay a coach and your player still thinks a 1,000 rating means anything, that’s even worse!!  Chess player egos are the most imagination driven egos in all of sports because the players, parents, and the coaches don’t make sure that everyone understands the rating system.  I explain the rating system pretty early on to my private students, and within a tournament or 2 to all the others!  If you don’t get to work at helping everyone understand the rating system, you are hurting your player’s growth.  Over or under 1,000, they should not be playing blind!

knife to a gun fight

Until you fully understand the ratings system, let’s talk about what to do when the pairings come up.  1) Look up the opponent’s history at USChess!  The “General” page will give their rating and category.  2.) Look at their, ” Tournament History” to see how many events they have played in and the highest their rating has been.  3.) Go back to the “General” page and click on “Game Statistics” to see the strongest players they’ve played and the result. 4.) click on, “Record by Year” to see total games, and winning percentage. If you do this the moment the postings come out, you will not be late for the round.  Even if you are late, it’s worth a minute or 2 to gather this info so that your player get’s the correct perspective on their opponent!

a-funny-t-rex-pictures-epic-duel

This past weekend the VSCA held a tournament at Maggie Walker High School.  The player rated 908 finished with a perfect score of 4-0 and a new rating high of 1082.  I’ll bet that none of his opponent’s knew that this player’s rating had fallen from 1077 in July of 2018, that they’ve only played 44 tournament games and that their record against opponents rated 1,000 or higher was a dismal 1 point out of 8 tries!  If you look at all of your previous opponents that have a rating of 1,000 or lower, you will find that none of them have a positive record against players rated over 1,000!  The next player finishing with 3.5 watched their rating go from 887 to 968.  They’ve played 75 tournament games.  they have 1 point out of 5 tries.  The player that took 3rd with 3.5 points, watched their rating go from 687 to 964!!  They’ve played 51 games, seen a player over 1,000 only twice and lost both times.  One player at the tournament who’s rating was 948 at the beginning of the tournament has played 131 tournament games met players over 1,000 only 9 times and has a score of 3.5 against those opponent’s.

tru-alien-vs-predaator-exclusive-063   The part that makes things confusing is the k factor, (http://www.uschess.org/content/view/12201/221/).  The K Factor tells what the maximum number of points a player can get for a win!  For players under 1,000 the K factor is 52 or more points.  For players at my rating high of 1943 the K factor is 27.5 points!  What that means is even if I had scored 3.5 points against players that were rated 235, 198, 259, and 302 above my rating, my new rating would be just 2058.  I would have picked up just 115 points, not the 277 that the 687 player got for the same numerical results.

The next time you get paired with someone who’s rating is 1,000 or less just remember, you are supposed to respect your opponent, not put faith in them!!  The 964 of today may have been 687 of just 4 games ago!  Learn the rating system, play intelligently, and know something about every opponent you play!

6 yr old coach dominates in k-3 of the Hopewell Classic

anagha wins

RCI’s newest coach, 6 yr old Anagha Sinkar took 1st place in the puzzle solving round and finished with a perfect score of 4-0 to win the k-3 in this event.  Anagha will be attending our, “Secrets to Long Combinations” camp the 26th-28.  Anagha has had a great year maintaining a 55% win percentage through 14 events, knocking off a 1203 player in Spotsylvania, coming in 46th for girls under 7 in the US, and being appointed as the new coach for Lucille Brown Middle School!  Her next appearance will be at the Maggie Walker k-3 tournament in January! laiyla

Laiyla Joseph,(left) of Lucille brown ponders her move while earning a ribbon performance in her 1st tournament!  Laiyla’s maturity and will to win make her a strong potential coach as well.  Laiyla hopes to improve on her rating this Saturday at our monthly tournament.  Keep up the good work!

If you want to improve at chess, RCI has the coaching skills and resources to help you make progress fast!!!  We are a full time Tournament Chess, Professional Development, and Entrepreneurial Training Company.  We train individuals and groups of any age and skill level up 1700.  Rates vary depending on your goals, strength, maturity, and length of commitment.  Call us today and share what you want your chess future to be like in 2019.  I’m sure we can help or get you headed in the right direction! 804-426-6058.