Elements of Long Combinations Camp; Checks and Captures Rule, Part 3!!! Dec 30th-Jan 3rd

via Elements of Long Combinations Camp; Checks and Captures Rule, Part 3!!! Dec 30th-Jan 3rd

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In partnership with US Chess Federation Sales, US Chess seeks eligible Title I schools that need equipment for their school-based chess programs. Programs that teach chess as part of their school day or are run as an afterschool enrichment activity are eligible to apply. Accepted schools will receive:

  • 5 vinyl chess boards
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To apply for a chess program starter kit, please apply online through this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ChessDonation-2019-2020

US Chess Executive Director Carol Meyer explains, “US Chess is delighted to partner with US Chess Federation Sales to promote chess among school children who are the most at-risk. This new program meets two US Chess goals: increase the use of chess in education and use chess to increase opportunities for under-represented segments of society. This partnership helps us meet our mission to empower people, enrich lives, and enhance communities through chess.”

As part of the application, you will be asked to provide documentation supporting your school’s eligibility for the donated chess equipment. US Chess staff will confirm eligibility and notify you of your school’s acceptance into the program. Once approved, US Chess Federation Sales will send you your program’s equipment at no charge to you. Up to 200 schools will be selected during the 2019-2020 academic year.

US Chess Federation Sales is the exclusive donor for this program. To purchase additional chess sets and other equipment, you can visit http://uscfsales.com. Shawn Sullivan is the Director of US Chess Federation Sales and says, “US Chess Federation Sales firmly believes in the power of chess to change lives, especially for school-aged children, but the reality is that there are schools across the United States that simply cannot afford to offer chess. This now changes with the introduction of the US Chess Education Program. We are helping lower the financial barrier for low-income schools to show that chess is for everybody! Our company is proud to partner with US Chess to provide chess equipment at absolutely no cost and I, personally, am thrilled to have the opportunity to give back to the game of chess in such a meaningful way.”

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Getting Started: Chess Resources

Chess Life Kids is the US Chess award-winning magazine that offers young players (12 and under) tips on improving their game while featuring stories about other chess-loving kids from across the country. Chess Life Kids comes with US Chess scholastic memberships in either print or digital formats. Subscribe today with a student membership by calling 800-903-8723 and selecting Option 4 or visiting the US Chess membership store online at https://new.uschess.org/join-uschess/.

ChessKid.com makes it easy for any teacher or adult to run a chess program! Whether after school or during the school day, the ChessKid Classroom Lesson Planner guides teachers and students through the most important 30 lessons that every beginner chess player needs to learn. Everything is in the planner, from videos and lessons to worksheets and games to play with the pieces. The planner also aligns each lesson with specific math concepts!

World Open U1800 Game 8 and Thoughts

tired 3[Event “World Open U 1800”]
[Date “2019.07.07”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Andrew Zhang”]
[Black “Mike Callaham”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B07”]
[WhiteElo “1820”]
[BlackElo “1741”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]

Game 8. It only took a few moves to realize that I was getting tired. I hadn’t played in 10 months! 1 loss out of 7 games still had me feeling good though. I also knew that I was working with part 4 of the rule. I decided to just draw on much discipline as I could, and hoped that would have to carry me through. I knew I had probably fallen out of any serious chance at 1st place, but that wasn’t why I was there. I wanted Scholarship Chess Business Center methods to carry me as far as my energy would allow. I’d never played 9 rounds straight before! As you will see, energy and discipline are heavily intertwined. I lasted 7.5 rounds! 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bg5?!world open 8-1This system has nuisance value but is considered by all of theory to be one of the weakest answers to the Philidor!} c6 6. Qd2 Qc7 7. O-O-O Be7 8. h4 b5 9. Bd3 a5world open 8-2It’s amazing to me how these young players find such good moves at times. Black has equalized and is slowly creeping up on the initiative. White’s next move is the computer’s top choice.  That for me is very instructive!} 10. Ne2! h6 11. dxe5? I know that calculating ed and de every turn is annoying!  It’s one of the features I like about this opening.  According to Kosten and the article I published in 2010, black has the better center because he has pawn control of d5 while white does not have control of d4. There are other benefits but hey, I’m not going to tell you everything and leave myself nothing to play?! LOL (11. Be3 Ng4 Black has a small advantage here. White had to play Ng3, Kb1, h5, Kb1, Nh2, or c3.  de was 11th on the list. 12. Ng3 Ndf6 13. Qe2 a4 14. a3 Bd7 15. Rhe1 O-O Black is definitely in the drivers seat.) 11… dxe5 12. Bxf6 {Just retreat the thing for crying out loud. This is where studying would have paid off.  This move aids my development and gives me the bishop pair! Nxf6 13. Qc3 Bd6
14. Ng3 O-O 15. Qd2world open 8-3

It appears that the pressure on f2 can begin now! That means no forward movement for either knight. That’s so cool!} Bg4?  (15… Bc5! 16. Nf1 Rd8 17. Qe2 a4 18. Ne3 a3 19. b3 Ng4 20. c3 Qa7 21. Rhe1 Be6 22. Kb1 Rab8 Putting the squeeze is better than what I played. I wanted to pin the knight down and maybe play rad8 but, that strategy is for when they are on the kingside!) 16. Kb1 Rfd8 17. Qe3 Be6 18. h5 {?!} Ng4 19. Qe2 world open 8-4Qb6?! According to the computer 19 …Bc5 is stronger and it’s also begging for a5-a4. I’m exhausted and I’m just relying on our methods and procedures to get me through the game!} (19… Bc5 20. Rdf1 a4 21. Nf5 a3 22. b3 Qa5 23. Qd2 Qa7 24. Qc3 b4 25. Qe1 Nxf2 26. Rh4 Rd7 27. Nxe5 Bxf5 28. exf5 Re8 29. f6 gxf6 30. Qd2 Rxe5 31. Qxh6 Rxd3  Wins the game!!) 20. Rhf1 Bc5 21. Rd2 a4 22. Nf5world open 8-5

Nxf2?? It was here that I got scared. I realized I was going blind.  That’s when you start having hind sight instead of foresight! LOL   The smoke and mirrors of chess exhaustion had began to show it’s ugly and repugnant head!!} (22… a3! 23. b3 Qa5 24. c3 Qxc3 25. Rc2 Qb4 26. Qd2 Bxf5 27. exf5 Qxd2 28. Rxd2 Bxf2 29. Be4 Rxd2 30. Nxd2 Rd8 31. Nf3 c5 32. Bc6 c4 33. Rc1 cxb3 34. axb3  Black is winning hard!) 23. Rxf2?? Mistakes come in pairs!! (23. N3h4 Qa5 24. a3 Nxd3 25. Rxd3 Bf8 26. Rg3 Kh8 27. Qf3 Qd2 28. Ne3 Rd7 29. Qd1 Qa5 30. Qe1 b4 31. Ka1 Rb7 32. Rgf3 bxa3 33. Qxa5 axb2+ 34. Kb1 Rxa5 Enough said) 23… Bxf5! Smoke and mirrors!! I actually thought that taking the rook was a better move. I expected this combination… (23… Bxf2 24. Qxf2 Qxf2 25. Rxf2 (25. Ne7!?+  Forgetting about this until I had looked at it again for a long time. Kf8 26. Ng6+ fxg6 27. Rxf2 Kg8) 25… Bxf5 26. exf5 e4 27. Be2 exf3 28. Bxf3 Rd6) 24. Rf1 Bg4 25. Qe1 a3 26. b3world open 8-6Be3?  What am I doing?? (26… Bb4 27. Qf2 Qa5 28. Rdd1 Bxh5 29. Qh4 Bd2 30. c3 Qxc3 31. Rxd2 Bxf3 32. Rc2 Qxd3 33. Rxf3 Qd1+ 34. Rc1 Qd4) 27. Re2 Bxf3 28. Rxe3 Bxh5 29. c4 bxc4 30. Bxc4 Rd1+ 31. Qxd1 Bxd1 32. Rxf7world open 8-7.jpg

I sat there for 20 minutes trying to figure out Q takes at e3 and thought I couldn’t move the g pawn.  I don’t need to move the g pawn with mate threats. lol  I was obviously confused so what did my opponent do?  what every smart one should, offer a draw.  I broke that rule too.  Whenever a kid offers you a draw it’s because they are losing.  double check very closely.  I was getting to tired and lost confidence and accepted the draw.  to be honest, if I hadn’t, I’d have probably taken the rook.  That’s winning too.  Until we got to the analysis board I didn’t know it was a win!} Kh8 33. Rg3 Qd4 34. Kc1 Bh5 Threatening mate!tired 2My last round won’t make it to the analysis. I could have simply withdrawn. I was absolutely useless. You could have set up 50 winning positions and if they were beyond a wbwbw//bwbwb I would have blown them all.  My 1st World Open was a smashing success for me and the principle I teach.  I’m very happy.  1/2-1/2

 

Game 7 World Open U 1800

[Event “World Open U1800”]
[Date “2019.07.05”]
[Round “7”]
[White “Mike Callaham”]
[Black “Max Li”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “D00”]
[WhiteElo “1741”]
[BlackElo “1705”]
[Annotator “Scholarship,Chess”]

Focus, focus, focus. When you’ve played an awesome game and one mistake
blows everything out, it can zap your energy. That satisfaction of a job well
done can refill your battery! This was one of those games where not following
your own procedures makes it hurt even more. Time trouble, count the delay
while writing the move and double checking the clock. Do your look and make
the best move time will allow. 38. f5? Came as a shock to me. Was so caught up in the stuff going on with c4, forgot the check had to go 1st.  Didn’t follow procedure. After the game I felt like Homer Simpson at the plant. I knew I’d played well or at least thought I had.  That’s ok, will never go off procedure again ever! I’ve been working this new variation of the London. I made a misplay on move 8 and handed over the initiative. I’d told my friend…”dude, there are a lot of 2 knight endings in this system. I hate endings!? not cause I can’t play them but because they’re usually no play in them. This one was different.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Bf4 c6 4. e3 Bf5 5. f3 e6 6. g4 Bg6 7. Bd3 Bd6world open 7-18. Bg5? This move is no good in the Nc3 London System. The best thing to do was keep
developing. (8. Nge2 Bxf4 9. Nxf4 Nbd7 10. h4 Qb6 11. Qd2 O-O-O 12. O-O-O=) 8… Nbd7 9. h4 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 Qc7 11. Nge2 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. O-O-O O-O-O=world open 7-314. e4 dxe4 15. Nxe4 Be7 16. Qb3 (16. a3 This would have brought it back to dead equal!) 16… Nd5 17. Kb1 Qb6world open 7-418. Qxb6?! {I’d asked him if he was looking for a a draw with that move. he said he wanted to play on. Probably shouldn’t have taken. I didn’t know it was that good for him. (18. Qd3!? h5 19. g5 Nb4 20. Qb3 Nd5 21. Qd3 Nb4 22. Qb3 draw!) 18… axb6! 19. Rdg1 g6 20. Nf2!? (20. h5 g5 21. c4 Ne3 22. Rc1 f5 23. Rc3 Nxc4 24. gxf5 exf5 25. Rxc4 b5 26. Rc2 fxe4 27. fxe4 Kb8 =) 20… c5 (20… Kc7 21. Nd3 b5 22. Ng3 Kb6 23. h5 g5 24. Ne4 Nb4 25. Ne5 Rhf8 26. c3 Nd5=  ) (20… h5 21. g5 Bd6 22. Ne4 Bf8 23. c3 b5 24. Nc1 He’s going to keep a small edge.) 21. c3 (21. Nd3 cxd4 22. Nxd4 Nb4 23. Nxb4 Rxd4 24. Nd3 h5 25. g5 just above equal) 21… c4 22. Ne4 b5 23. Nd2 Kd7world open 7-2Looks like it’s time to attack the A file. It’s instructive how black takes over the file! 24. a4 Ra8 25. axb5 Ra4 26. f4 Rha8 27. Nf3 Bd6world open 7-528.Ne5+ {Diagram #} (28. Kc2 f6 29. g5 fxg5 30. hxg5 h5 31. Nh4 Rg8 32. Ra1 Rxa1
33. Rxa1 $13) 28… Bxe5 29. dxe5 Ne3 30. Kc1 Nxg4 31. Kd2 h5 32. Rb1 Ra2world open 7-633. Ng3? (33. Rhf1 Kc7 34. Nd4 Rd8 35. Rg1 Kb6 36. Rge1 Nh6 37. Kc2 Rda8 38. Rbd1 R8a5 unclear) 33… Kc7 (33… R8a5 34. Ke2 Kc7 35. Rhd1 Rxb5 6. Rd2.  The lead is a static pawn but it’s going to be hard getting it back!!) 34. Ne4 Rd8+ 35. Nd6 Nf2 36. Rhe1 Nd3 37. Re4 Nxb2 38. Ke3world open 7-7All of blacks choices lead to an edge for white from here! This ending is
more instructive than I could have imagined!} f5??  (38… b6!? 39. Rd4 Na4 40. Rb4 Nc5 41. Rbxc4 Rf8 42. Ne4 Ra5 43. Nxc5 bxc5 44. Rxc5+ Kb6 45. Rc6+ Kxb5 46. Rc7 Kb6 47. Rdc4 with a slight edge to white)  39. Rxc4???+ (39. b6!+  This wins in all lines! I hate blundering when their’s a check!! Kb8 Black could have played Kd7, Kb6, and Kc6.  They all lose but the lines are just to long and complicated to leave you with a definitive analysis in the time I have.  Stop By and we’ll talk about it!  40. Rd4. Surely I had enough time left for these 2 moves! The next 15 moves, I’m not sure! It’s instructive as well!}
Nd3 41. Rxc4 Nf2 42. Rc7 Ng4+ 43. Kd3 Nf2+ 44. Kc4 Ne4 45. Rxb7+ Ka8 46. Rc7 Kb8 47. Rd1 Ng3 48. Rc6 Rb2 49. Rd3 Ne4 50. Nxe4 Rxd3 51. Nd6 Rxd6 52. exd6 Rd2 53. Kb5 Rd5+ 54. Ka6 Rd2 55. c4 {and wins}) 39… Nxc4+ 40. Nxc4  There was no fighting my way out and I later resigned.  0-1