Glossary of Terms for Statistics

@ or Up: Career games played at their current rating, 100 points up, and 200 points up. If their rating is 1216 then this includes their career games at 1200, 1300, and 1400.

@ or Up:The percentage of career points kept from games that are at, 100 points, and 200 points above their peak rating.

Amateur and “K”: That group’s average 1st official rating and the highest number of point they could earn or lose in 1 game.

Bonus Points: They call them bonus points, but a, “Handicap” would make it better understood. When you are performing above your expected level you earn more points for each draw and win. The best way to understand it is to realize when playing chess you are playing the odds, not the percentages. For a more detailed explanation, visit; https://richmondchessinitiative.wordpress.com/2020/09/05/coaching-saves-time-money-and-effort-5-slots-left/

Category: Your result in a tournament has to be more than a point higher than your statistically averaged expected result. If you would be expected to average 3.48 points in six rounds then you would have to score at least 4.4801 points (actually 4.5) in the six rounds. If you play tournaments where you are near the top-rated in the section then it may be difficult to get that exceptional performance because even going 6 out of 6 is not enough when your average expected result is 5.03 out of 6 (kind of hard to exceed a perfect score).

Draw Percentage: Drawing percentage in that group.

Games: These are what us chess categorizes as regular rated games.

Career Games Average: The average number of annual career games.

HGPR: Average of the highest number of games played in one year by that group of players.

HGPYI: Highest number of games played in a year by 1 person in that group of players.

High + K: the K Factor of the highest rated person in the group.

“K”: The, “K” factor is the maximum number of points a player can earn or lose in a tournament game. I think this chart is a little out of date but go to this link for a, “K Factor” chart and it will show you the maximum for all ratings. http://www.uschess.org/content/view/12201/221/. If you wish to toy with some ratings, go to the ratings estimator at this link; http://www.uschess.org/index.php/Players-Ratings/Do-NOT-edit-CLOSE-immediately.html

Keep Percentage: Often mistaken for a win percentage, this number represents the percentage of points they have kept or protected. A record of 2-1-1 has a keep/protection percentage of 62.5%. This one is easy to explain. 100% divided by 4 = 25%. So we have 2 wins or 50%, then a draw that’s half of 25% which is 12.5%, and nothing for a loss. That’s 50% +12.5% = 62.5%. This is for played games only. Byes do not count. A 5 round tournament with a 1/2 point bye and a record of 3-1-0 = 87.5%.

Loss Percentage: Losing percentage in that group

Low+ K: The K Factor of the lowest rated person in the group.

Peak Rating: The highest rating held over a player’s career.

PPGAP: “Points Per Game After Provisional. Each person must play 25 games to get an official rating. These games are called provisional. This number represents the number of points per game based on their peak rating. Let’s say a player finishes 25 games with a rating of 672, then has their rating peak at 1272 over the next 100 games. Their PPAG is 600 divided by 100 = 6.00.

Statistically Averaged Expected Result: Lack of a better way to describe it, it’s the average of the ratings of the players in a tournament and how statistically they should perform. This formula is more important when pursuing International Master and Grandmaster Norms, but there is one for every player at every tournament!

Win Percentage: Winning percentage in that group.

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